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ThaPig
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Why aliens don't talk to us

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by ThaPig
Brina and Mazz discuss the mysteries of the universe.

Keywords
possum 2,411, aliens 1,153, tapir 162, alien invasion 5
Details
Type: Comic
Published: 3 months ago
Rating: General

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182 views
21 favorites
28 comments

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Furlips
3 months ago
Proof that there are others out there: "They refuse to have anything to do with us."

Bunners
ThaPig
2 months, 4 weeks ago
Maybe we just smell funny
( ᐢ (oo) ᐢ )
thekzx
3 months ago
This is delightful and lovely to look at. I wish I had this much commitment to scenery.
ThaPig
3 months ago
Thanks! It's kind of a curse because I spend a lot more time drawing backgrounds than making the actual story.
 ( ᐢ (oo) ᐢ )
thekzx
2 months, 4 weeks ago
Well, how well can you do backgrounds if you spent time on *only* them?

Maybe there's a position for you at DKP afterall :P
moyomongoose
3 months ago
I've seen a comic one time that depicted a space craft from a different planet passing by Earth.
One of the extraterrestrial beings aboard the space craft said to the other, "No, don't stop there. Just keep on going. Keep on going. Keep on going..."
ThaPig
3 months ago
I have seen a few of those. The problem is that the author usually assumes his personal system of morality is universal.
 ( ᐢ (oo) ᐢ )
Waccoon
3 months ago
Aha!  Even with the most advanced technology in the universe, aliens still can't solve the most complicated problem of all:  Taxes!
tailgat
3 months ago
complicated? no alien race in the universe can beat us in circumventing taxes. forged laws, fiscal set-ups, corruption, blackmail, violence, we have all the means. and obviously we will always swear to god (or them) we are all honest...
ThaPig
3 months ago
They probably solve death first.
 ( ᐢ (oo) ᐢ )
tailgat
3 months ago
i think you have so much fun making those last little stories, art and storywise.
great addition to the corpus of your work.
ThaPig
3 months ago
Thanks. I hope you are enjoying reading them!
 ( ᐢ (oo) ᐢ )
curtainshowers
3 months ago
Interesting way of thinking of it ^-^
ThaPig
3 months ago
She smokes a lot of weed, remember?
 ( ᐢ (oo) ᐢ )
curtainshowers
2 months, 4 weeks ago
That's fair xD
Issarlk
3 months ago
That reminds me of the flawed "Earth had one in billions of billions of chance to sustain life. It's proof God exists" argument.
Except the probability that the planet we live on can sustains our life is 1, if it didn't we wouldn't be here to notice.

That's the kind of reasoning that doesn't help make believers look reasonable.
ThaPig
3 months ago
The point of that theory is that Earth is somehow special or unique because someone created it for a purpose. I guess it works as well as any of the other proposed solutions since none can be proven.
 ( ᐢ (oo) ᐢ )
Issarlk
2 months, 4 weeks ago
Right, except saying that only one earth like planet exist is not reasonable. It's an act of faith on its own with untold billions of planets around.
ThaPig
2 months, 4 weeks ago
The point of the Fermi paradox is not that there is only one Earth-like planet, it's actually the opposite, the aquation already assumes there are billions of planets like ours out there. The paradox part is we have not detected any radio signals from space, meaning we don't have knowledge of other technological species. That doesn't count the possibility of many Earth-like planets that could have developed only plant life or animals that don't build radios or even advanced species that use a totally different kind of transmission medium we can't detect. Scientists have already detected planets out there that have similar conditions to Earth, but with present technology, there is no way to know if they have life or not.

There are infinite possibilities, for example, what if there is a civilization of beings that have no sense of hearing? They could perceive magnetic fields instead and have no concept of sound. They could be very advanced in other fields of science but never have developed radio.
Issarlk
2 months, 3 weeks ago
There is also the fact that using detectable radio communication might last only a couple centuries and signals from aliens could  have crossed earth way back in the past when humans didn't have the technology to listen.
ThaPig
2 months, 3 weeks ago
Yeah, it's not just a matter of distances, but time. there could have been a civilization that flourished for centuries, but eventually died out and their signal went dead. We would never find out about them. The planet closest to us, Mars, shows signs of having been life-friendly in the past but became hostile later. How many worlds like that may there be out there, that became unlivable for whatever reasons. Sometimes I think the galaxy could be a graveyard full of planets where life existed for a period and died out.
TheAtomicDog
3 months ago
A lovely little conversation, and the clever layout trick of using the first and forth scenes to "bookend" the vignette did not go un-noticed.

And I do indeed believe Earth is under an active contact quarantine. No one should have to ask why.
ThaPig
3 months ago
Thanks. The scenery is kind of inspired on real-time locations from my memories.

I would think advanced aliens would just consider us boring.  ( ᐢ (oo) ᐢ )
Chucky
3 months ago
I love this stuff. I think the better explanation is through understanding the actual distances of space and that even the speed of light is rather slow. Throw in the time it takes to cross those distances and the amount of time it takes a civilization to advance and there's no wonder we haven't heard anything. Maybe there is intelligent life within 100 light years of Earth, but they're still in the medieval era. Maybe they'll be the ones that pick up our radio signals in a few centuries.
ThaPig
3 months ago
Most probably is a combination of technology-oriented intelligence being very rare and huge distances between places where it pops out. I think bacterial level of life is pretty common, probably even in our solar system. but the conditions necessary to develop into complex intelligent beings are very hard to find.
Chucky
2 months, 4 weeks ago
I agree. Given the huge range of conditions that life exists here on earth, and that life has existed here for most of Earth's existence. I hope I live to see a probe reach Jupiter's moon Europa, the ice moon with the ocean under it. If life can exist next to boiling volcanic vents on our sea floor, it could exist under the same conditions there.
ThaPig
2 months, 4 weeks ago
I also suspect something similar to life could be found in that neighborhood. Europa is the best candidate, but there are a few of those moons around there. A lot has been said about how the discovery of extraterrestrial life could impact different religions, but there is also the matter of how it will impact science's definition of life. Right now we defined life as a specific combination of carbon and some other junk, with vague speculation of a possible silicon variant. But all those still have a narrow view of what qualifies as life. I'm thinking it's possible probes could find some kind of animated matter that doesn't follow our "organic biased" view of life. Something that has a totally unexpected chemistry, something that is not exactly "life" by present definitions, but still manages to play all of life's tricks, like reproducing and evolving. That would have a deep impact on human culture. So far we are clinging to the idea we have that unique state that places us above the inanimated stuff laying around. But one day we would have to admit "life" is just one in a number of complex forms of matter that populate the universe. There could be levels of complexity that are as high above ours, as us are from mere aminoacids.
Chucky
2 months, 4 weeks ago
We'll have to admit that Spock was right when he said, "It's life Jim, but not as we know it." It's been a while, but I seem to remember the original Star Trek explored these ideas from time to time.
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