Welcome to Inkbunny...
Allowed ratings
To view member-only content, create an account. ( Hide )
Ellie Rainbow
« older newer »
Matathesis
Matathesis' Gallery (77)

Goodbye [Story]

Royal Court
funeral.txt
Keywords male 880858, female 763708, squirrel 22354, story 9926, sad 4185, no sex 860, red squirrel 568, funeral 101
Maeve looked around the room. Her dad sat next to her, trying to keep himself together. Sat next to him was her younger sister Rachel, barely three years old, her legs moving back and forth as she sat. Maeve wondered if Rachel knew the full extent of what was going on here today – she barely had come to terms with it herself. Next to Rachel sat their grandmother, her mother’s mother, like dad just about managing to keep her face neutral as she gripped Rachel’s paw. In the last three chairs in the aisle sat her aunt and uncle – her mum’s sister and her husband – and their daughter Claire, five years older than Maeve, plastered with the bored teenage look that she always had, yet somehow looking appropriately sombre at the same time.

In the row behind them sat her dad’s family; his parents and brother and sister, and a rather stern-looking squirrel with white hair that she’d never seen before but had been told was her granddad’s brother-in-law, or something. Other extended family members filled the crematorium’s chapel, as did a number of other people – well-wishers from the community who probably attended every funeral going; the family of badgers from a few streets away with the girl-badger that Rachel was starting to be inseparable from and the boy-badger that growled whenever he saw Maeve; the families of a couple of the few friends she’d managed to make in her new school who were obviously trying to make an effort. She was glad to see some faces she recognised from their old home on Brownsea Island – none of her friends though, although that was to be expected really as it was a weekday afternoon.

She wasn’t really paying attention to what was being said from the front. The Labrador priest, or vicar, or whatever they were called, was speaking as if he knew her mum but of course he didn’t. They’d only been in Hazelford for a few months, nobody here really knew her. Something was said, and her dad shifted in his seat next to her. She looked up to see him sniff back some tears, and almost automatically she held out the box of tissues she’d been entrusted with. Andrew took one of them, smiled sadly at his daughter, and dabbed his eyes with the tissue as he put his arm around Maeve and gave her a squeeze.

She couldn’t work out why she wasn’t able to cry herself. She was sad, distraught even, at the sudden loss of her mother as the cancer nobody knew she had taken hold without warning, but there were no tears for some reason. She considered trying to force it, but didn’t want to. As her gran said, she should grieve in her own way.

Another shift in the seat next to her as her dad took a deep breath and stood up. Maeve turned in her seat to allow her dad to exit the aisle and approach the podium at the front. She knew he had been dreading this, but he had wanted to do this – for his wife Alison, and for their two daughters. Maeve slid over a seat so she was sat next to Rachel, and put her arm around her sister’s shoulder.

“I was seventeen when I first met Alison,” Andrew said slowly to keep his voice from breaking. “I remember falling in love with her hair first, of all things, and I remember thinking that she’d never give me a second glance.” He smiled wistfully at the memory. “Turned out that when she first saw me, she thought the same, though not about the hair!” He ran his hand over his thinning hair line which resulted in a polite ripple of laughter around the room.

As he went on, Maeve noticed that Rachel’s legs had stopped swinging back and forth, and although she wasn’t really aware that her little sister had been humming softly to herself, she noticed that she had stopped as she listened to their dad up on the stage behind the podium. Again, Maeve wondered if Rachel really knew what was going on. Was she understanding what Dad was saying? Did she know why all these people were gathered together? Was she wondering where Mum was, not aware that her lifeless body was in the wooden box in front of them?

She started to feel those tears well up inside of her, but knew that these weren’t really tears of sadness but of… anger? Was she angry? In a way, she probably was. Was she angry at her mother for leaving them? Well, maybe but no. She couldn’t be angry at Mum, it wasn’t her fault. Was she angry at whatever entity it was that took her Mum away? Probably; it was unfair that such a loving and caring person would be here one day and suddenly not the next.

“I think of the times we spent together as a family,” continued Andrew from the stage, looking towards his daughters, “and I know Rachel is probably too young to understand what’s going on, but I do know that Alison loved them both dearly and I hope that my… our girls don’t think she abandoned them.”

Maeve looked directly at her father who looked back at her. She instinctively squeezed Rachel’s shoulder, vaguely aware that the toddler had stopped swinging her legs and was also intently looking at the squirrel on the stage. Andrew, for his part, looked directly at his daughters instead of just in their direction, and addressed them personally. The rest of the congregation were irrelevant; it was almost as if there were only the three of them in the room.

“Your mother loved you very much, girls – I love you very much. We’ll be okay, just the three of us. Dad’s gonna take care of you.” Andrew swallowed a sob and turned to the coffin behind him. “And now, my love, it’s time to say goodbye.” He made no attempt to stop his voice breaking now. “I love you, Alison – I always have, I always will, and I’m really gonna miss you. I’ll take care of our girls, and I’ll make sure they know what their mother was like.” It was difficult for Maeve to hear what her father was saying now – not just because he had moved away from the microphone on the podium, but also his voice was quieter, more intimate, as he spoke directly to his wife of eleven years. “I guess I’ll see you on the other side.”

From behind her, Maeve heard somebody stand up – her dad’s dad gently approached the stage and led the sobbing squirrel back to his seat. As the two walked away, she heard her dad say something; she couldn’t really hear it but she guessed – correctly – that it was the two words that he had been saying over and over again for the past three months: “Cancer sucks.”

And there were the tears of sadness.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
page
1
page
2
page
3
page
4
page
5
page
6
page
7
page
8
page
9
page
10
page
11
page
12
page
13
page
14
page
15
page
16
page
17
page
18
page
19
page
20
page
21
page
22
page
23
page
24
page
25
page
26
page
27
page
28
page
29
page
30
page
31
page
32
page
33
page
34
page
35
page
36
page
37
page
38
page
39
page
40
page
41
page
42
page
43
page
44
page
45
page
46
page
47
page
48
page
49
page
50
page
51
page
52
page
53
page
54
page
55
page
56
page
57
page
58
page
59
page
60
page
61
page
62
page
63
page
64
page
65
page
66
page
67
page
68
page
69
page
70
page
71
page
72
page
73
page
74
page
75
page
76
page
77
page
78
page
79
page
80
page
81
page
82
page
83
page
84
page
85
page
86
page
87
page
88
page
89
page
90
page
91
page
92
page
93
page
94
page
95
page
96
page
97
page
98
page
99
page
100
page
101
page
102
page
103
page
104
page
105
page
106
page
107
page
108
page
109
page
110
page
111
page
112
page
113
page
114
page
115
page
116
page
117
page
118
page
119
page
120
page
121
page
122
page
123
page
124
page
125
page
126
page
127
page
128
page
129
page
130
page
131
page
132
page
133
page
134
page
135
page
136
page
137
page
138
page
139
page
140
page
141
page
142
page
143
page
144
page
145
page
146
page
147
page
148
page
149
page
150
page
151
page
152
page
153
page
154
page
155
page
156
page
157
page
158
page
159
page
160
page
161
page
162
page
163
page
164
page
165
page
166
page
167
page
168
page
169
page
170
page
171
page
172
page
173
page
174
page
175
page
176
page
177
page
178
page
179
page
180
page
181
page
182
page
183
page
184
page
185
page
186
page
187
page
188
page
189
page
190
page
191
page
192
page
193
page
194
page
195
page
196
page
197
page
198
page
199
page
200
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
 
 
page
1
page
2
page
3
page
4
page
5
page
6
page
7
page
8
page
9
page
10
page
11
page
12
page
13
page
14
page
15
page
16
page
17
page
18
page
19
page
20
page
21
page
22
page
23
page
24
page
25
page
26
page
27
page
28
page
29
page
30
page
31
page
32
page
33
page
34
page
35
page
36
page
37
page
38
page
39
page
40
page
41
page
42
page
43
page
44
page
45
page
46
page
47
page
48
page
49
page
50
page
51
page
52
page
53
page
54
page
55
page
56
page
57
page
58
page
59
page
60
page
61
page
62
page
63
page
64
page
65
page
66
page
67
page
68
page
69
page
70
page
71
page
72
page
73
page
74
page
75
page
76
page
77
page
78
page
79
page
80
page
81
page
82
page
83
page
84
page
85
page
86
page
87
page
88
page
89
page
90
page
91
page
92
page
93
page
94
page
95
page
96
page
97
page
98
page
99
page
100
page
101
page
102
page
103
page
104
page
105
page
106
page
107
page
108
page
109
page
110
page
111
page
112
page
113
page
114
page
115
page
116
page
117
page
118
page
119
page
120
page
121
page
122
page
123
page
124
page
125
page
126
page
127
page
128
page
129
page
130
page
131
page
132
page
133
page
134
page
135
page
136
page
137
page
138
page
139
page
140
page
141
page
142
page
143
page
144
page
145
page
146
page
147
page
148
page
149
page
150
page
151
page
152
page
153
page
154
page
155
page
156
page
157
page
158
page
159
page
160
page
161
page
162
page
163
page
164
page
165
page
166
page
167
page
168
page
169
page
170
page
171
page
172
page
173
page
174
page
175
page
176
page
177
page
178
page
179
page
180
page
181
page
182
page
183
page
184
page
185
page
186
page
187
page
188
page
189
page
190
page
191
page
192
page
193
page
194
page
195
page
196
page
197
page
198
page
199
page
200
A sad story from Maeve's perspective of the funeral of her and Rachel's mother. Almost a bit of an origin story – I knew from when I first created Rachel that her dad was a single father, and while the reason why he is a bit of a cliché really, it is what it is.

There are some other background stories of my characters that I'll probably put into prose form - I'm not the world's greatest writer but at least it gives me something to do!

Keywords
male 880,858, female 763,708, squirrel 22,354, story 9,926, sad 4,185, no sex 860, red squirrel 568, funeral 101
Details
Type: Writing - Document
Published: 2 weeks, 4 days ago
Rating: General

MD5 Hash for Page 1... Show Find Identical Posts [?]
Stats
42 views
1 favorite
0 comments

BBCode Tags Show [?]
 
New Comment:
Move reply box to top
Log in or create an account to comment.