Welcome to Inkbunny...
Allowed ratings
To view member-only content, create an account. ( Hide )
Cat Heart Love
« older newer »
DOtter
DOtter's Gallery (32)

Plushies Loneliness Dress

Paypal Does It Again
plushielonelinessdress.txt
Keywords male 682470, female 561365, human 51249, boy 42805, bear 25855, kangaroo 9701, pig 4196, donkey 3487, owl 2242, teddy bear 822, plushy 728, lonely 574, winnie the pooh 285, pooh 195, piglet 139, kanga 132, gloomy 76, eeyore 41, christopher robin 11, hundred acre woods 1, baby roo 1, a a milne 1, e h shepard 1
It was a rather breezy day in the Hundred Acre Woods, but the sun was shining just then and that made things pleasant. Eeyore was playing with Piglet, as usual; being Christopher Robin's second-favourite and favourite friends respectively, they tried to be together so that he would always know where to find them. Eeyore was feeling quite chipper that day and had offered Piglet a ride, which both of them were enjoying. But the two best friends paused when one of them heard a noisy thing approaching from up the path they were riding on.

"Oh!" Piglet cried. "That's Christopher Robin's footsteps!"

"To be sure!" Eeyore replied. "I'd know them anywhere! Oh Christopher Robin, come and play!"

Well in fact it was Christopher Robin coming down the path, but he was walking a little oddly and not as quickly as usual. When he'd caught up with his friends they could see why. The poor boy's clothes were quite unusual.

"Why Christopher Robin," said Eeyore, "I believe you are wearing a dress."

"I am, I suppose," the boy replied. "I have to be in my best dress today and it's this one. Father is taking me to the zoo, but he's going to meet his particular friend Mr. Shepard there and wants me to look respectable. Oh bother! I'm sure having to wear this silly thing will entirely spoil my birthday!"

"Birthday!" said Eeyore. "Why, I'd forgotten it was today! Happy Birthday!"

"Happy Birthday, Christopher Robin!" Piglet added. "How old are you today?"

"I'm six. I'd feel better about this silly dress if I had you in my pocket, Piglet. Is that all right?"

Piglet, (who was really quite shy), said that he would be all right as long as Christopher Robin was with him. Then Eeyore asked if he might come, too as he'd hoped to meet a wild zedrba one day. His ears dropped a bit when Christopher Robin frowned.

"Father says I can only take what fits in a pocket, so it's Piglet or nothing, I'm afraid."

Then Piglet promised Eeyore that he'd look especially at the zedrba and tell him all about it when he got home. Christopher Robin gave Eeyore a special hug and hurried back to where he lived. Eeyore went and visited with Kanga, (who got a bit lonely all by herself), and mentioned Christopher Robin's birthday to Owl as he went.

The morning became the afternoon and the afternoon became the evening. The wind picked up a bit, then went down a bit more and the sun got even warmer before it got cooler again. The Hundred Acre Woods got to be quite sultry and had just decided to become clammy. Eeyore and Kanga were getting ready to go inside when Christopher Robin found them. He set Piglet down first. They could all see that he was holding something behind his back.

"Eeyore! Eeyore!" Piglet cried. "It was a very un... un... uncertain day! It was stuffy and noisy and just wait until you see who..."

"Piglet!" Christopher Robin cried. "I wanted to tell!"

"Oh, I'm sorry," Piglet replied. "I was so excited that I nearly forgot," he added. ("The zedrbas were all stripety and rather smelly," he murmured to Eeyore.)

"That's all right," Christopher Robin said. "We have new friends," he added, "and I'd like you to make them feel welcome."

Then he brought out his right hand. In it was a bear. He was a rather silly looking bear with a rather silly looking smile. But what struck Eeyore dumb was the way Christopher Robin was holding that silly, old bear, because he was holding him the way he usually held Eeyore!

"This is Winnie," Christopher Robin went on.

At this, Winnie sneezed with a pooh sound. He looked up at Christopher Robin and said, "Pardon me!"

"Winnie the Pooh," the boy continued. "He's my second-best friend! Please don't fret Piglet, you'll always be my favourite."

Eeyore, his mouth hanging open a little, looked at Kanga and Kanga looked back, her head tilted a little in puzzlement. But Christopher Robin hadn't finished.

"I know you get a little lonely Kanga," he said, holding out his other hand. "So I got a friend for you... oh, he's not as big as you after all. Nevermind though, he's just big enough to be your baby roo! Here you go! Now you won't be lonely," and he put a little roo in Kanga's arms.

Kanga held the joey close and petted his ears and Baby Roo cooed back at her. "Thank you, Christpher Robin!" Kanga cried. "It's the nicest somebody else's birthday present I've ever had!"

Just then Owl flew down the path with a piece of paper in his talons, which he gave to Christpher Robin. It had Hi Brfdi on it, which Owl explained was Happy Birthday. Christopher Robin thanked him, then took Piglet's paw in one hand and Pooh's paw in the other and lead them up the path to have some cake. Kanga put Baby Roo in her pouch and hopped after them with Owl flying beside as slowly as he could so as to keep up.

Eeyore staid behind, his mouth half open, feeling more like a toy than he had since he'd come to the Hundred Acre Woods. "Oh Christopher Robin! How could you?" he murmured, in a much gloomier voice than was usual for him. He noticed his voice. The river was nearby, so he went and stood on the bank and looked at himself. He looked so awfully sad! "How could you?" he said again. Eeyore watched himself sounding gloomy and knew that he'd never feel chipper again. The water looked cool and deep and somehow final. Perhaps he should jump in, float away like a stick, never have to be alive again. He looked up the path towards Christopher Robin's house and knew he couldn't do that, not yet; he still needed the boy who no longer needed him.

Copyright © 2011 by A.D. Burrows, All Rights Reserved
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
page
1
page
2
page
3
page
4
page
5
page
6
page
7
page
8
page
9
page
10
page
11
page
12
page
13
page
14
page
15
page
16
page
17
page
18
page
19
page
20
page
21
page
22
page
23
page
24
page
25
page
26
page
27
page
28
page
29
page
30
page
31
page
32
page
33
page
34
page
35
page
36
page
37
page
38
page
39
page
40
page
41
page
42
page
43
page
44
page
45
page
46
page
47
page
48
page
49
page
50
page
51
page
52
page
53
page
54
page
55
page
56
page
57
page
58
page
59
page
60
page
61
page
62
page
63
page
64
page
65
page
66
page
67
page
68
page
69
page
70
page
71
page
72
page
73
page
74
page
75
page
76
page
77
page
78
page
79
page
80
page
81
page
82
page
83
page
84
page
85
page
86
page
87
page
88
page
89
page
90
page
91
page
92
page
93
page
94
page
95
page
96
page
97
page
98
page
99
page
100
page
101
page
102
page
103
page
104
page
105
page
106
page
107
page
108
page
109
page
110
page
111
page
112
page
113
page
114
page
115
page
116
page
117
page
118
page
119
page
120
page
121
page
122
page
123
page
124
page
125
page
126
page
127
page
128
page
129
page
130
page
131
page
132
page
133
page
134
page
135
page
136
page
137
page
138
page
139
page
140
page
141
page
142
page
143
page
144
page
145
page
146
page
147
page
148
page
149
page
150
page
151
page
152
page
153
page
154
page
155
page
156
page
157
page
158
page
159
page
160
page
161
page
162
page
163
page
164
page
165
page
166
page
167
page
168
page
169
page
170
page
171
page
172
page
173
page
174
page
175
page
176
page
177
page
178
page
179
page
180
page
181
page
182
page
183
page
184
page
185
page
186
page
187
page
188
page
189
page
190
page
191
page
192
page
193
page
194
page
195
page
196
page
197
page
198
page
199
page
200
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
 
 
page
1
page
2
page
3
page
4
page
5
page
6
page
7
page
8
page
9
page
10
page
11
page
12
page
13
page
14
page
15
page
16
page
17
page
18
page
19
page
20
page
21
page
22
page
23
page
24
page
25
page
26
page
27
page
28
page
29
page
30
page
31
page
32
page
33
page
34
page
35
page
36
page
37
page
38
page
39
page
40
page
41
page
42
page
43
page
44
page
45
page
46
page
47
page
48
page
49
page
50
page
51
page
52
page
53
page
54
page
55
page
56
page
57
page
58
page
59
page
60
page
61
page
62
page
63
page
64
page
65
page
66
page
67
page
68
page
69
page
70
page
71
page
72
page
73
page
74
page
75
page
76
page
77
page
78
page
79
page
80
page
81
page
82
page
83
page
84
page
85
page
86
page
87
page
88
page
89
page
90
page
91
page
92
page
93
page
94
page
95
page
96
page
97
page
98
page
99
page
100
page
101
page
102
page
103
page
104
page
105
page
106
page
107
page
108
page
109
page
110
page
111
page
112
page
113
page
114
page
115
page
116
page
117
page
118
page
119
page
120
page
121
page
122
page
123
page
124
page
125
page
126
page
127
page
128
page
129
page
130
page
131
page
132
page
133
page
134
page
135
page
136
page
137
page
138
page
139
page
140
page
141
page
142
page
143
page
144
page
145
page
146
page
147
page
148
page
149
page
150
page
151
page
152
page
153
page
154
page
155
page
156
page
157
page
158
page
159
page
160
page
161
page
162
page
163
page
164
page
165
page
166
page
167
page
168
page
169
page
170
page
171
page
172
page
173
page
174
page
175
page
176
page
177
page
178
page
179
page
180
page
181
page
182
page
183
page
184
page
185
page
186
page
187
page
188
page
189
page
190
page
191
page
192
page
193
page
194
page
195
page
196
page
197
page
198
page
199
page
200
by DOtter
This is a response to
dmfalk
dmfalk
's writing challenge to make a story using the concepts Plushy, Loneliness and Dress.
Even in the Hundred Acre Woods, things don't go forever unchanged. One day the boy hero showed up in a traditional garb that really didn't flatter him...

Keywords
male 682,470, female 561,365, human 51,249, boy 42,805, bear 25,855, kangaroo 9,701, pig 4,196, donkey 3,487, owl 2,242, teddy bear 822, plushy 728, lonely 574, winnie the pooh 285, pooh 195, piglet 139, kanga 132, gloomy 76, eeyore 41, christopher robin 11, hundred acre woods 1, baby roo 1, a a milne 1, e h shepard 1
Details
Type: Writing - Document
Published: 8 years, 1 month ago
Rating: General

MD5 Hash for Page 1... Show Find Identical Posts [?]
Stats
293 views
3 favorites
15 comments

BBCode Tags Show [?]
 
dmfalk
8 years, 1 month ago
Awww.... Now we know why Eeyore always seemed gloomy. :( And historically accurate, as for Christopher Robin wearing a dress-- Up until not long after the turn of the last century, it was the common formal attire for boys under about 6, and since Christopher Robin's adventures in the Hundred Acre Wood (both he, the wood and the plushies were all real-- A.A.Milne's stories were actually based from Mr. Robin's active imagination from that age) were from that period (early 1900s), that is entirely in character. I did notice the deliberate misspelling of "zebra"- A child of that age would make that kind of mistake. :)

Well-written for Winnie's origin, I should say. :)

d.m.f.
DOtter
8 years, 1 month ago
Thanks! I read Plushy and Loneliness and immediately thought of Eeyore. I wasn't sure what to do about Dress. (I'd thought of Kanga at first.) Then I remembered the Heritage Canada short about the origins of Winnie The Pooh. I reviewed it and sure enough, there was Christopher Robin in what looked like a dress! You can see it for yourself here! "Zedrba" was originally a typo. Then I remembered the heffalump and kept it.
dmfalk
8 years, 1 month ago
Although I've never been a Pooh fan (thank you, Disney), I'm glad Disney never got their hands on the Robin estate's properties. Even though Robin was English, the plushies along with the rest of the Robin heritage rightfully belongs in Canada. (I don't remember if the Robin family still owns the Hundred Acre Wood in England, but it IS a National Heritage Site over there.)

Like I said, it was a common practice of the upper class in Anglo-American societies all over the globe up to the very early part of the last century for young boys up to between 5-7 to dress formally in a dress, rather than trousers or breeches.

And here I thought you were zedding instead of zeeing... ("zedrba") ;)

d.m.f.
DOtter
8 years, 1 month ago
Oh yes, that too! (Zedrba was originally going to be Zedbra. The typo was actually stronger, though, so I kept it.)

...but, the Robin estate? Surely you meant the Milne estate, or that part of it left by Christopher Robin Milne anyway. (According to Wiki, he was an only child and had only a daughter himself, and she was severely handicapped, but he had an uncle Kenneth who might have had issue.) And I'm not sure why you'd think that the residue of his heritage belongs in Canada. I believe there's a statue of the original Winnie, (the RL bear), somewhere in Winnipeg, which is entirely appropriate, but the rest of the inspiration for Alan A Milne's famous children's books is entirely British; the plushies, the Hundred Acre Woods, (or its RL counterpart in Ashdown Forest), both the author and his son. (Wiki reports that Christopher's childhood plushy friends now reside in the New York City Public Library, although I heard that Disney got their hands on most of the collection at one point, while Piglet alone remained with Christopher to the end of his days, probably resident in his book store. What I heard could easily be incorrect, of course and I trust Wiki more than my own memory.) If you'd care to elaborate... ?

Thank you anyway for your very kind comments, Dennis! I always enjoy hearing from you.
CyberCornEntropic
8 years, 1 month ago
If I recall correctly, isn't Roo MIA?
DOtter
8 years, 1 month ago
I wasn't aware of that, but you're right! According to this article, he went missing some time before the plushies were sent on a tour of America --

His disappearance was described by A.A. Milne in the birth certificate; "Roo is believed to be somewhere in Sussex, but no details are available. A subsequent dog who became part of the establishment, took him for a walk once and left him in a hollow tree, from which he was extracted a year later. But the spirit of adventure was now strong upon him and soon afterwards he was off again, whether or not with the co-operation of the dog this time is not known".
CyberCornEntropic
8 years, 1 month ago
I guess Roo went a'Waltzing Matilda on his walkabout.
dmfalk
8 years, 1 month ago
Well, you and CyberCorn covered it well. The Robin/Milne family estate fought Disney, and Disney lost, if I recall correctly.

d.m.f.
CyberCornEntropic
8 years, 1 month ago
That's a pretty good origin story and certainly reads better than many of the excuses out there in Media-land.  Good work keeping in the spirit and tone of the original stories.
DOtter
8 years, 1 month ago
Thank you very much!
CyberCornEntropic
8 years, 1 month ago
You're welcome.

Melancholy but not overly depressing.  A reminder that children can be thoughtless and cruel without meaning to cause pain.

And yet, as this is an origin story and we know there are stories that follow it, a hint of hope dare we stop and think about it.  A hint that somehow, someway, the pain will ease, and Eeyore will move on.  Such is growing up.

There, hopefully, that's more useful than a "good work". ;p
DOtter
8 years, 1 month ago
"Good work" alone was very kind and please believe me that my thanks were sincere. If you'll recall the story of the Pooh Sticks, Eeyore did eventually "fall in the river." (Perhaps he didn't know that he floated.) I think his depression took a better turn after they fished him out, though, if I recall correctly the way Milne portrayed him in later stories. Perhaps being rescued proved to him that Christopher Robin really did still care.

You know, I wonder if poor, old Eeyore was in any way a model for Douglas Adams's character, Marvin the Paranoid Android. They had a thing or two in common, after all.
CyberCornEntropic
8 years, 1 month ago
Don't worry.  I knew your thanks were sincere.  I apologize if I managed to sound otherwise.  I had thought of my last post's stuff after I'd posted the first time and just wanted to share it.

In light of Milne's portrayal of Eeyore as you mentioned, this story does help fill in the gaps, as it were.  It certainly reveals more depths to Eeyore without getting gritty or edgy as some modern writers would be tempted to do.  I am very glad you weren't tempted/resisted the temptation.

As for being a model for Marvin the Paranoid Android (or characters like Grumpy Bear), I couldn't tell you.  I doubt Douglas Adams could tell you either (considering he's dead). :o
EmmetEarwax
5 years ago
The pic reminds me of one of a mutant sheep whose had consisted only of ears connected to the neck. It was, of course, stillborn.

Our fault. We bred and crossbred livestock concentrating lethal genes.
DOtter
5 years ago
I think I chose an image of the original Eeyore, or tried to. It does look rather messy. But in the young eyes of a certain Mr C.R. Milne, it was a donkey, and that's good enough. No? ;)
New Comment:
Move reply box to top
Log in or create an account to comment.