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You're a Great Big Chicken!
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Attack of the Space Vixens!
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Inktober 2016 - 29
Valentines Day Card 2002
You're a Great Big Chicken!
Attack of the Space Vixens!
Still another girl of the month from the floppy 2005 calendar, Ms. January was another of my established characters, Psyche, the Furry Incarnation of the Soul.

This scene from Ovid's Metamorphoses captures Psyche leaving Erebus with the box containing Persephone's secret to beauty – a nice, long nap – which the jealous Aphrodite tricked her into fetching.  In a short while, Psyche would open the box in hopes of using the secret herself so as to wow Eros (AKA Cupid), all according to Aphrodite's nefarious plan.

Granted, she hadn't earned her wings at that point, but without them, who would recognize her?  Her hairstyle and clothes were adapted from references, and her wings came from an actual Mediterranean butterfly related to the Monarch.  Her current appearance actually dates from around 2000 when I redesigned her from the Tale Spin-inspired bear with bird wings I came up with in 1991.  (Cupid's primary change is that he's lost his clothes as time wore on.  The cad.)

Art © 2005-2017 Marvin E. Fuller

Keywords
female 506,880, cat 108,139, feline 72,886, pinup 14,937, wings 13,762, wildcat 359, psyche 22
Details
Type: Picture/Pinup
Published: 1 year, 5 months ago
Rating: General

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EmmetEarwax
1 year, 3 months ago
The wings ARE familiar. You see, I raised monarchs from the eggs, and that much time has elapsed that I am not sure how many weeks passed from hatching to the pupa transformation, but I do know that transformation from caterpillar to the pupa took but 11 hrs. They ate milkweed voraciously. Eat,eat,eat,eat. Once they become the butterfly, they never touch milkweed again -except to lay eggs (female), but favor ageratum. I recall one butterfly,newly emerged, that on its first flight (scared by me ?) flew over the house and roosted in a tall oak tree. Flew in one minute further than it ever walked as a lumpen caterpillar.

I learned many things from feeding them. Get them as eggs: a tachinid fly destroys many, and so does a virus. The first time I raised one, a fly maggot emerged. I then raised the fly pupa (larva uses its last larval skin as the cocoon) to see what the enemy was ! I also later learned that the monarchs I raised were NOT the migratory generation, but,rather,the parents of such.

All this when I was younger. Now I don't have the energy or commitment to do this.
CyberCornEntropic
1 year, 3 months ago
They're a very distinctive species.  Entire trees can be covered with migrating Monarchs resting from their trip.  They're quite a tourist attraction in the Pacific states, with laws protecting them from human troublemakers.
EmmetEarwax
1 year, 3 months ago
Well, that's in the Pacific. in Mexico, a different line makes its multi-thousand mile journey to a certain small stand of trees. This seems to be endangered. Part of the reason why I stopped raising them, is that they seem to be not around anymore !
EmmetEarwax
1 year, 3 months ago
I deduce that you live in the far west.
CyberCornEntropic
1 year, 3 months ago
I live in the Pacific Northwest, which is mostly too far north for them.  But I did read about them in magazines like <i>Ranger Rick</i>.
EmmetEarwax
1 year, 3 months ago
The two migration patterns of Monarchs (Pacific,Mexican) raises the possibility that two distinct species may eventually appear, as they don't seem to mix. Geographical isolation .
CyberCornEntropic
1 year, 2 months ago
It's quite possible, population isolation being one of the mechanisms of natural selection.
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