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Weaselgrease

[RANT] Programmer's Ranting!

I'm raging right now for one specific reason.  It's a very simple reason, one that anyone who's ever coded a dynamically resizing DIV object in a webpage or changed a font color on mouse-over should take to heart. What's the reason?

JQUERY IS NOT THE NEW JAVASCRIPT

JQuery is a library.  A library OF JavaScript.  A library of JavaScript that is built for people who wanted to spend less time programming it and more time seeing it work.  So a fellow named John Resig developed JQuery as a 'quick and easy' solution of programming JavaScript for a reasonable cross-browser compatibility by shoehorning every bit of JavaScript into a compressed code format.

What's wrong with this?  Let's put it this way...

Say you want to be an artist.  But you can't invest the time and energy into developing your art skills.  So someone writes a computer program that basically does the art for you with a few mouse clicks and a setting or two (Photoshop filters, Adobe After Effects, etc.).  So five years down the road when you're a 'cool artist' after memorizing a $500 'how to use art software' book from cover to cover the company is liquidated for whatever reason and their software patents go to Sony.  Sony packs all their software away and never releases a new version of the software.  You're left to cling to the remnants of dying software until it's no longer supported by your current OS.  Thus, you no longer have the ability to make art.

Because JQuery is a library of a programming language, it's simply an organized and 'user friendly' means to using the language, but the most important rule about libraries that I can never stress enough is that you still need to know the language.  The fact that colleges are actually adopting JQuery classes was disturbing enough, but the whole reason I'm even ranting today is because I've been looking for two hours just to find information on a small issue to do with JavaScript and I'm being falsely directed to JQuery sites because the people there refer to JQuery code as JavaScript and don't even discern the difference of the two.  Even with two distinct examples of each language right in front of them.  JavaScript and JQuery don't go hand-in-hand.  They're not compatible with each other, ironically enough.  You use them independently.  And only the saddest cases would use JavaScript and JQuery in a webpage together.  Though I imagine they exist.  Someone somewhere probably has a self-made blog with JQuery scripts scattered between JavaScript.  And they probably copy-pasted both instances from around Google and have no clue how it actually functions.

They can live in their ignorance, just get off my internet.

Anyway, I'm done.  I just needed to complain about it.  I shouldn't have to sift through JQuery confused for its core programming language to find the code that makes the JQuery actually work.

And I just know Klorsis is going to troll me all day for this post, but I ain't even mad.
Viewed: 108 times
Added: 5 years, 6 months ago
 
phydoux
5 years, 6 months ago
Angry weasels are scary! 0.o
40ozhyena
5 years, 6 months ago
Tell us how you really feel. :D
Hipstotter
5 years, 6 months ago
No really, why are you mad?
MadDog
5 years, 6 months ago
You ain't even mad... BUT YOU RAGIN'.

LIEZ
UrbanSaint
5 years, 6 months ago
NERD RAGE! :P
PlagueRat
5 years, 6 months ago
I get that feeling.  It's like people asking if they have Google Chrome and they say their home page is Google.
KNIFE
5 years, 6 months ago
Why so serious?

sorry couldn't resist.

really...I couldn't!. I tried but the urge was just to strong!!!
AndyNonimose
5 years, 6 months ago
I'd rather use PHP, but that's just me.

To be honest, I've never really heard much of anything about JQuery. Perhaps this is a good thing?
Weaselgrease
5 years, 6 months ago
There's a lot of browser-related context that PHP can't acquire.  In fact, I often use JavaScript and CSS in conjunction with PHP to deliver webpages to the end-user.  Also, PHP is my language of choice.  I love how easy it is to just whip up a page with it.  But today I'm programming a Java applet and needed to use JavaScript to dynamically resize the applet object when the user resizes the window.  The issue at hand was that every browser but Google Chrome was cooperating with a trigger.  And every time I tried to find an answer as to why I either got someone asking 'Why don't you just use JQuery?' without any attempt to actually solve the problem, or I got them assuming JQuery was what the subject was about to begin with and them saying 'I don't know what's wrong with your browser because the JQuery code works for me.'  Even if it was explicitly stated JQuery wasn't involved or desired.
AndyNonimose
5 years, 6 months ago
I see, but from the sound of it, if you're just stuffing the applet into a div, couldn't you just manipulate the scaling with CSS? (It's been a few semesters since I last did any serious dabbling with web design)

The main issue I could see going with that though, would be if the div scales, but the applet size remains static. Hmm...
Weaselgrease
5 years, 6 months ago
The concern was actually with informing the applet that it had been resized so that it would know to adjust its interface accordingly.  I figured it out. =)
E1337ist
5 years, 6 months ago
I agree. You should know how to use the core elements of the language before diving in to libraries. Otherwise, you tend to have sh*t code.

P.S.    I would have thought (or rather, hoped) this would would be a rant on JavaScript being pushed to do things it wasn't designed for (i.e., developing full-blown programs), but since you're talking about web development, it's fine. :)
Weaselgrease
5 years, 6 months ago
In my experience, challenging the boundaries of a language is a great way to learn the most about it.  Doing so brings up very important concepts that are always fantastic for better learning a language.  'Why is this so difficult?  Is this the best it can do?  Maybe there's another method I should use.'  It teaches you more about the world the language was developed for and gives you a respect for the scope of the language.

Technically speaking, there's no such thing as the wrong way to do something if it doesn't throw an error.  If it does what it was intended to do from conception and fits in the programmer's expectations, it's acting as intended.  What comes under scrutiny in that case is whether the programmer's expectations are practical and realistic. ;)  Especially if they release the code for distribution.
SimonTesla
5 years, 6 months ago
jQuery's an awesome library (IMHO), but I'd agree that it's only truly useful if you understand the capabilities of the Javascript/DOM functionality it wraps, and it's definitely overkill for quick jobs like this. Good to hear you got it figured out though.

Though, speaking as an ex-PHP dev, PHP is teh suck. ;P
Weaselgrease
5 years, 6 months ago
jQuery is a nice way to unify all the different implementations of JavaScript without having to create 200 lines of 'if not this browser' statements and realizing the important chunks of your code need to be rewritten, but when it was originally released it was intended to be a compressed format to hopefully minimize wasted space and wasted processes in webpage code.  

When it comes down to it, JavaScript itself allows you at least four different ways to do the same thing, and one is more efficient than the other three.  JQuery was intended to make it so you really only use the most efficient way in most cases.  Unfortunately the creators of the idea didn't consider what might happen if they didn't release a W3C style 'this is how it is' standard for use, so now JQuery has over 4,000 different forms (including customized forms) and people are using the first method they discover rather than the best method available to accomplish their tasks.  It's like if anyone could release their own flavor of Linux and all they really care about improving is the desktop layout/color scheme.

The concept of JQuery at this point is solely dependent on the fact that the people who use it just haven't actually learned JavaScript enough to try to rewrite the JQuery library they link their page to and ruin the integrity of the original purpose entirely.
cats
5 years, 6 months ago
some1 needs to have a snickers
Krechevskoy
5 years, 6 months ago
I think I might love you for this rant...

I have had to, on an infuriating number of occasions, go to the JQuery source code and work my way backwards to raw javascript, because the answer to what should have been a very simple question just resulted in page after page of people linking to JQuery.  The worst part is, normally after I spend an hour or more working my way back out of JQuery, my code ends up being less than 20-30 lines.  I don't want to have to include the whole of JQuery and completely change up my code style, for what ends up being a few dozen lines of code!
Weaselgrease
5 years, 6 months ago
You are a braver man than I.  I would ragequit at the idea of reverse-engineering JQuery the moment it was suggested. ;)
Krechevskoy
5 years, 6 months ago
My boss is very lucky that I like him... very, very lucky...
pirohmaniac
5 years, 6 months ago
So... the jquery slideshow I put on a customers site is bad? 0.o
Weaselgrease
5 years, 6 months ago
Not at all!  JQuery is still a valid and effective tool.  Frankly if it were appreciated as a tool for efficiency and not as the end-all for JavaScripting necessities I'd probably have used it more.  The population's reaction to its very existence is what I have a problem with.  I've never seen technically inclined people so eager to avoid educating themselves about how something works.  And I understand it's based almost entirely around the fact that the website design industry (and programming industry in general) has less patience every passing day.  For a career, it's imperative to use JQuery to save yourself those few hours just to get the job done.  Especially so you're not wracking your brain trying to get that arithmetic done right.

The general consensus of the programming public that the convenience and saved time outweighs the value of understanding the source to the point that it's now required learning.  That's where my sad comes from.
pirohmaniac
5 years, 5 months ago
Ah ok cool. Was worried for a minute X3
 Haven't gotten much into programming yet, not for lack of trying. Things just get in the way.
I'll get there eventually. Gonna learn me some Java for Android and Python for blender. Doubt any javascript. Just building sites cause our customers want them, but it's not what i want to do.

" Weaselgrease wrote:
Say you want to be an artist.  But you can't invest the time and energy into developing your art skills.  So someone writes a computer program that basically does the art for you with a few mouse clicks and a setting or two (Photoshop filters, Adobe After Effects, etc.).  So five years down the road when you're a 'cool artist' after memorizing a $500 'how to use art software' book from cover to cover the company is liquidated for whatever reason and their software patents go to Sony.  Sony packs all their software away and never releases a new version of the software.  You're left to cling to the remnants of dying software until it's no longer supported by your current OS.  Thus, you no longer have the ability to make art.


This part made me laugh X3   See it over and over with my customers. Mostly accounting programs and a farmer who has this milking program running on dos on an ancient machine. has a 5 inch floppy drive X3
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