Welcome to Inkbunny...
Allowed ratings
To view member-only content, create an account. ( Hide )
newer »
The Girl who Dreamed of Horses
the_balloonaut.rtf
Keywords male 682889, wolf 117385, boy 42848, fun 3939, adventure 3218, flying 2571, balloon 2007, balloons 1128, cub clean 220, wolf pup 20
The Balloonaut

by Winter



Going to sleep was never easy. Not even at night, when he was tired. And to take a nap now, in the middle of such an exciting day did just not seem possible.

The little wolf puppy squirmed and fidgeted in his crib, totally unable to find a good sleeping position. More than anything, he wanted Mommy to come and pick him up. To bring him back to the playground again.

It had been so different today. The swings and the sandbox and the slide were still there, and so was his favourite, the pirate fortress. But there was so much more! He didn't really have any words for it. This morning there had been colourful stands all around and behind and beyond the playground, twinkling lights and exciting rides, and wonderful smells were coming from everywhere.

The puppy had never heard the word 'fair', so he had no idea what it was all called. It was fun, though, great fun. Timmy had been there, too; his little grey kangaroo friend, with his mom and dad. The two of them had played, as always, and they had also marvelled at all the new things. Daddy had let them go on a merry-go-round, and they had squealed happily all through the ride, waving to everybody from their colourful horses. Then they had cried a little bit when the fun was over.

"Nap time, Dave!"

Mommy's words had been of the worst kind! The puppy had tried to hide, but against the all the bright colours his jet black fur had been as visible as a candle at night. So they had gone home, after many promises to return once he had slept, and after saying an almost-tears bye-bye to Timmy.

As they left the fairgrounds a nice man had given him a round, pink balloon, which Daddy tied to his wrist. It had been great fun to pull at the string and watch the balloon dance and jump up there in the air. Squeals and giggles followed them all the way home.

And now, after drinking a bottle of milk and having his nappy changed, Dave lay in his crib and tried to sleep. But it wasn't easy. Still, like the good puppy that he usually tried to be, he fought back the urge to cause a ruckus. The promise to return to all the fun was not one to waste on being stubborn.

He watched his balloon as it floated halfway to the ceiling. Daddy had taken it off his wrist and tied it to the crib instead, and now it rocked slightly on the breeze from the window. Feeling at peace, the puppy yawned and rubbed his eyes. Slowly but surely, his lids grew heavy, and soon he closed them.

That was when the idea struck him, and he was suddenly wide awake again. A sound escaped him that was half a gurgle, half a giggle, and he bounced with excitement where he lay, waving his little paws towards the pink balloon. How much fun it would be! How great, if only he could...

With an effort, he first sat, the stood up. He could walk, even without anything to hold on to, but only a few steps at a time before he thudded down on his well-padded behind. And here, with the railings of the crib for support, it was easy to reach the place where the balloon's string was tied.

The little wolf had worried that he wouldn't be able to untie it, but that turned out to be no big deal. Neither was tying it back to his wrist. Now came the big test. He had seen huge balloons before, on TV, that flew and carried people with them. How neat it would be, he always thought, to fly like that!

His balloon very wasn't big, but neither was he. So maybe it would work. He closed his eyes and clenched his tiny fists; wishing, wishing, wishing...

And it happened!

He felt his feet leave the soft blankets of the crib. When he opened his eyes he saw that all that held him down was his hand clutching at the railing. He let go, and with a whoosh of rushing air and a boyish squeal of delight, he soared upwards. The balloon bounced against the ceiling once, twice, then it drifted out the window.

Up and up he went, gasping and giggling as he could see his house, then his neighbourhood, then the playground and all the new things that had been put up there. He tugged at the string, and the balloon obediently went lower. People pointed up at him and stared, no doubt in awe of this wondrous thing; a flying boy! Someone told him to come down, but he just giggled at that. What, now? When he had so much fun?

Then there were others, other kids. All flying like he did, with their balloons tied to their wrists. The sight made him so happy. What fun they could have! He saw his friend Timmy, tied to a yellow balloon and waving frantically with his free hand. Dave waved back, both beaming at each other, then he urged his own balloon to go up, higher and higher. Up into the clouds.

They were wet and hazy, not as fluffy and cottony as they looked from below, but he still loved them. The other kids couldn't go as high as he, so he was alone now. Floating, bobbing up and down with the air currents, sky above and clouds below, and with the sun keeping him warm.

Still higher he went, passing airplanes, diving at one point to fly with a flock of birds. How surprised they looked to see him! They played for a little while.

He would pretend that the clouds were dangerous monsters, and as he pointed, the birds swooped in mock-attacks. They seemed to have fun, too. Dave wished that he could have talked to them, but he wasn't very good at talking yet. He knew a lot of words when he heard them, but hadn't yet learned to make the right sounds, himself.

Then the clouds parted, and the birds flew off. The puppy made an 'ooh' face as what must surely be the whole world spread out below him. There was the town, and the countryside with fields filled with crops or cows or barns and farmhouses. There were roads where cars zoomed by, and a river where boats sailed. He even saw a forest, where his birds were darting in and out among the trees. And between all that and him, lots and lots of colourful balloons, each carrying a toddler.

He spotted Timmy's yellow balloon a little higher than the others', and tugged at his own to sink towards his kangaroo friend. The two boys squealed happily at one another, then used their free arms for a hug. But Dave could not stay. His balloon wanted higher, and he had no choice but to follow.

This time he went much, much higher than the clouds, so high even the sun was below him. It turned dark, and he could see stars. He knew he was in space; he liked space. It was a neat thing, with stars and comets and planets and rockets and...

Whoosh!

He almost wet himself as a meteor went by, nearly colliding with his balloon. More of the glowing little balls came hurtling through space right next to him, and he grabbed one and was whisked away. The speed made him scream with laughter as he went past the moon, then planet after planet. It seemed like the meteor was playing with him, because now it turned around and headed back the same way, with several of its friends tagging along.

They chased a spaceship, and Dave waved at its captain as he passed the driver's window. Then they zoomed across the skies of another world, with all kinds of strange creatures below. Even monsters, though they weren't so scary from this high up. He tugged at his balloon, wanting to stay here longer, but they were already heading back to Earth.

Past the sun once more, and then they flew next to an airplane for a little while. When Dave recognised his home town, he tugged at the balloon's string again, and said bye-bye to the meteor. Slowly, he sank down towards the ground, towards home. He yawned. Now he was really ready for his nap.

As a last bit of fun, he circled his house, peering in through the windows. Daddy was in the living room, sitting in his favourite chair and reading a book. Dani was in her room, napping on her bed, but he couldn't find Mommy at first. This made him worried, until he found her upstairs, having a shower in the bathroom. She looked up at him through the window and waved, and he giggled happily as he waved back.

Feeling really tired now, he flew in through his bedroom window, the balloon bouncing against the ceiling until it reached the crib. Dave thudded down on his well-padded rump, untied the balloon from his wrist and fastened it on the railing. Then he crawled in beneath his blanket and fell asleep.

It wasn't long before Mommy shook him awake. He yawned and rubbed his eyes, then sat up and smiled at her. She picked him up and kissed him. Purring happily, he nuzzled her cheek, then his adventure burst out of him as he stumbled over the words he wanted to say. Mommy just stroked his cheek.

"Out flying, huh? That must have been fun." He nodded, grinning. "I hope you saw me when I waved at you."

"Uh-huh!"

Dave's eyes shot open. After he woke up he hadn't been sure whether it had been a dream or not, but Mommy had seen him! Then it must have been real! He tried to tell her more, but it only came out as bubbling laughter. She let him keep it up while they walked back downstairs, then silenced him with another kiss.

"So, ready to go back to the playground, Davey-little?" He nodded. "I bet Timmy's already there waiting for you."

"Yah!"

They met up with Daddy and Dani in the hall, and all four of them set off towards the fair, ready for more fun. Dave couldn't wait to tell Timmy all about his adventure, or at least as much as he was able to find words for. He knew his friend would make big eyes, as he always did when something fascinated him, and that he would be envious of the marvellous pink balloon that was now once more tied around his wrist.

It wasn't long before he could see the lights again, hear the sounds and smell all the yummy food and candy. Then he saw a yellow balloon bobbing up and down a bit away, and started squirming to be let down. He only tripped once as he hurried up to his grinning roo friend.

The tale of flying was already forgotten, for now. All he wanted to do was play with his best friend, and have so much fun.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
page
1
page
2
page
3
page
4
page
5
page
6
page
7
page
8
page
9
page
10
page
11
page
12
page
13
page
14
page
15
page
16
page
17
page
18
page
19
page
20
page
21
page
22
page
23
page
24
page
25
page
26
page
27
page
28
page
29
page
30
page
31
page
32
page
33
page
34
page
35
page
36
page
37
page
38
page
39
page
40
page
41
page
42
page
43
page
44
page
45
page
46
page
47
page
48
page
49
page
50
page
51
page
52
page
53
page
54
page
55
page
56
page
57
page
58
page
59
page
60
page
61
page
62
page
63
page
64
page
65
page
66
page
67
page
68
page
69
page
70
page
71
page
72
page
73
page
74
page
75
page
76
page
77
page
78
page
79
page
80
page
81
page
82
page
83
page
84
page
85
page
86
page
87
page
88
page
89
page
90
page
91
page
92
page
93
page
94
page
95
page
96
page
97
page
98
page
99
page
100
page
101
page
102
page
103
page
104
page
105
page
106
page
107
page
108
page
109
page
110
page
111
page
112
page
113
page
114
page
115
page
116
page
117
page
118
page
119
page
120
page
121
page
122
page
123
page
124
page
125
page
126
page
127
page
128
page
129
page
130
page
131
page
132
page
133
page
134
page
135
page
136
page
137
page
138
page
139
page
140
page
141
page
142
page
143
page
144
page
145
page
146
page
147
page
148
page
149
page
150
page
151
page
152
page
153
page
154
page
155
page
156
page
157
page
158
page
159
page
160
page
161
page
162
page
163
page
164
page
165
page
166
page
167
page
168
page
169
page
170
page
171
page
172
page
173
page
174
page
175
page
176
page
177
page
178
page
179
page
180
page
181
page
182
page
183
page
184
page
185
page
186
page
187
page
188
page
189
page
190
page
191
page
192
page
193
page
194
page
195
page
196
page
197
page
198
page
199
page
200
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
 
 
page
1
page
2
page
3
page
4
page
5
page
6
page
7
page
8
page
9
page
10
page
11
page
12
page
13
page
14
page
15
page
16
page
17
page
18
page
19
page
20
page
21
page
22
page
23
page
24
page
25
page
26
page
27
page
28
page
29
page
30
page
31
page
32
page
33
page
34
page
35
page
36
page
37
page
38
page
39
page
40
page
41
page
42
page
43
page
44
page
45
page
46
page
47
page
48
page
49
page
50
page
51
page
52
page
53
page
54
page
55
page
56
page
57
page
58
page
59
page
60
page
61
page
62
page
63
page
64
page
65
page
66
page
67
page
68
page
69
page
70
page
71
page
72
page
73
page
74
page
75
page
76
page
77
page
78
page
79
page
80
page
81
page
82
page
83
page
84
page
85
page
86
page
87
page
88
page
89
page
90
page
91
page
92
page
93
page
94
page
95
page
96
page
97
page
98
page
99
page
100
page
101
page
102
page
103
page
104
page
105
page
106
page
107
page
108
page
109
page
110
page
111
page
112
page
113
page
114
page
115
page
116
page
117
page
118
page
119
page
120
page
121
page
122
page
123
page
124
page
125
page
126
page
127
page
128
page
129
page
130
page
131
page
132
page
133
page
134
page
135
page
136
page
137
page
138
page
139
page
140
page
141
page
142
page
143
page
144
page
145
page
146
page
147
page
148
page
149
page
150
page
151
page
152
page
153
page
154
page
155
page
156
page
157
page
158
page
159
page
160
page
161
page
162
page
163
page
164
page
165
page
166
page
167
page
168
page
169
page
170
page
171
page
172
page
173
page
174
page
175
page
176
page
177
page
178
page
179
page
180
page
181
page
182
page
183
page
184
page
185
page
186
page
187
page
188
page
189
page
190
page
191
page
192
page
193
page
194
page
195
page
196
page
197
page
198
page
199
page
200
First in pool
The Girl who Dreamed of Horses
The Accidental Speleologists
The Balloonauts - Double Trouble
As some of you might already know, Dave the wolf pup and Timmy the kangaroo boy are two recurring characters of mine. Usually, they're up to adventures or mischief together, but this time it's Dave (as a toddler) who goes off on his own. Or should I say 'up on his own'...

More balloon fun with both Dave and Timmy can be found here:
The Balloonauts - Double Trouble by Winterimage

Keywords
male 682,889, wolf 117,385, boy 42,848, fun 3,939, adventure 3,218, flying 2,571, balloon 2,007, balloons 1,128, cub clean 220, wolf pup 20
Details
Type: Writing - Document
Published: 8 years ago
Rating: General

MD5 Hash for Page 1... Show Find Identical Posts [?]
Stats
120 views
0 favorites
2 comments

BBCode Tags Show [?]
 
Hibiscus
8 years ago
This story is fun!  I like that it's got a point of view that hasn't quite grasped the distinction between reality and dreams.  
For me, the picture of a black-furred wolf trying to hide at a colorful fair was equally funny and adorable.
Winterimage
8 years ago
Black fur is usually good camouflage, but unfortunately only when it's dark. ;)

Thank you for reading and commenting, and for watching as well. I'm glad you liked the story. Dave and his friend Timmy will be back with more adventures soon. Those two are my favourite characters to write, and I especially had fun with their balloon adventures. Much of the fun was trying to imagine the world through the eyes of someone, as you said, who can't really tell what's real and what's fantasy or dream.
New Comment:
Move reply box to top
Log in or create an account to comment.