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Blissful Warrior
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Werewolves Of London
05_dont_stop.mp3
Werewolves Of London
You Should Be Dancing
This mashup includes Dick Clark, Ted Turner, Ed Schultz, Snakeman Show from a Yellow Magic Orchestra promo single,
SUPERHYPERFALCON
SUPERHYPERFALCON
, Casey Kasem, dialogue from "Law & Order: Criminal Intent", "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit" and "Pawn Stars", Reverend Al Sharpton, Lawrence O'Donnell, Rachel Maddow, Steely Dan, The Beatles and Fleetwood Mac.

Keywords
mix 2,597, lupine assassin 1,737, remix 1,333, mashup 1,128
Details
Type: Music - Single Track
Published: 4 years, 5 months ago
Rating: General

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AlexanderPony
4 years, 5 months ago
WOW this awesome I loved the the way you legends in there (Dick Clark and Casey kasem who we just lost they were the greatest) god you are so awesome lupine love ya cutie
LupineAssassin
4 years, 5 months ago
Thanks! :D
AlexanderPony
4 years, 5 months ago
you're welcome lupine cutie love ya
dmfalk
4 years, 5 months ago
OK, so I saw the title, thought Fleetwood Mac-- Check! ;)
Then I recognised the Steely Dan music before reading the credits- Check! ;)

The YMO voice segment, while on a YMO promo disc, should properly be credited to Snakeman Show, who did much of the humour for YMO (even credited as SET in later, Service-period recordings)- That bit was from the Multiplies promotional material on both sides of the Pacific back in '80. :) (Not that YMO were lacking in humour... The guy behind Snakeman Show had far better English skills than the three lads from Tokyo, plus I recognise his voice from the one Snakeman Show album I do have. ;) )
 
#111. ;)

d.m.f.
LupineAssassin
4 years, 5 months ago
Fixed, and thanks!! :D
dmfalk
4 years, 5 months ago
A bit of trivia: other than that promo disc, none of the Snakeman Show material, nor "Tighten Up", saw official US release until the Restless reissues of the early '90s, including the retrospective best-of, Kyoretsu na Rhythm-- A&M only obliged to release 3 US albums, and ignored everything after BGM. The only reason A&M had YMO in the first place was as a package deal to get the Japanese distribution through Alfa. A&M wasn't expecting a hit with "Firecracker", which was why A&M initially put their first LP on the then-newly-acquired Horizon label- Just an obligation deal, nothing more. Nobody expected the level of influence YMO would have globally, including the US and especially in the UK. (For example, all of M's New York • London • Paris • Munich album was mostly done, but was reworked after Robin Scott heard Solid State Survivor, and would later work with YMO, both on future M albums and on YMO's group & solo albums, including a Japan-only EP with Ryuichi Sakamoto, The Arrangement.)

Sorry about that- I guess I get wound up on something I like, plus I I was really into it back in those days... ;)

d.m.f.
LupineAssassin
4 years, 5 months ago
"Technodelic" was perhaps the first album to use mostly loops and samples.
dmfalk
4 years, 5 months ago
Mike Batt's Zero Zero was recorded just a few months before YMO's Technodelic, both using a Fairlight CM synth. Trevor Horn would follow suit in the same timeframe.

The distinction should be made that these were the earliest to use extensive digital sampling, as extensive tape-based loops and samples go back to at least Sgt. Pepper-era Beatles. Holger Czukay's Movies (1979, main single being "Persian Love") uses almost entirely tape loops and samples.

YMO, it should be noted, was the first recording act to record exclusively digitally from Solid State Survivor (1979) onwards, though hardly the first to ever record digitally. (Stevie Wonder would be the next, in the same year, with Songs from the Secret Life of Plants.)

Oh, and the reason why A&M was so hot & heavy for a Japanese distribution deal? Two words: The Police. :)

d.m.f.
LupineAssassin
4 years, 5 months ago
YMO's 1980 world tour certainly won them extra exposure, especially the live-via-satellite broadcast from A&M's Chaplin Stage.
dmfalk
4 years, 5 months ago
For all intents and purposes, they were the Japanese Beatles. :) The only major market at the time they couldn't crack wide open- despite the success of "Firecracker"- was the US. But what they influenced, did, many times over. :) (Even Kraftwerk's Computer World was a response to Solid State Survivor, even though Kraftwerk was a major influence on YMO!)

It's quite possible ELO's Time was also influenced by YMO, especially since that came out after Survivor and Multiplies.

d.m.f.
LupineAssassin
4 years, 5 months ago
Not just possible, it was "X∞Multiplies" inevitable. ;) Without them, music would be A LOT duller.
dmfalk
4 years, 5 months ago
Indeed! :)

And it depends on which version of Multiplies we're talking about-- The original Japanese mini-LP (was released on a 10") or the US edition (a mix of tracks from both Survivor and Multiplies). The whole cyberfuture theme (and style) certainly came from Survivor. Heck, I think they got an early copy of BGM, due to the ambient mixing.

But yeah, like I said- YMO laid some serious influence back then... :)

d.m.f.
DOtter
4 years, 5 months ago
You have a real talent for this. I wouldn't have thought Steely Dan would work with Fleetwood Mac, but it fit perfectly.
LupineAssassin
4 years, 5 months ago
Thank you. :D
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