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fen_ria_rpg_en-us.doc
Keywords rpg 1104, tabletop 189
Fenária RPG EN-US 3.7
What is RPG?
RPG means role-playing game, it's a game in which you pretend to be a different person, in which you play a role. It's pretty much a “pretend-to-be” thing. Most people played something similar in their childhood, when they pretended to be characters from television shows and the like. Or maybe you were that kind of kid who had a “secret identity” to fight the evil in the world.
RPG is different from that because it uses rules. Every game has rules that you either agree with or that are enforced upon you. But let's not touch that subject just yet.
A group of friends gather to play this strange thing. They sit around a table, one of them carrying the book containing the rules. One of them is chosen as Referee. The Referee then starts to tell a story. The other players, supposing that they already went through the characterization, control, each, a character inside the story that the Referee is telling. So, whenever it's necessary that said characters make a choice, the Referee asks the other players what their characters will do in that situation. Once they answer, the Referee must continue the story, based on the actions of the player characters... until another decision is needed from them.
As you see, RPG is a pretend-to-be thing, but, over anything, is storytelling. It's like a collaborative legend being written. There's the Referee, who have the “script” of the story and there's the other players, who control the heroes of the story. The script of the Referee will be modified by the actions of the other players and the result is a story that can be funny, thrilling, dramatic and written by all the players while they “improvise”.
However, at some point of the story, the Referee isn't sure if the action that certain character is about to perform is successful or not. That's why we use rules. This file contains a set of rules written by me. There are different sets of rules available either for free or for fee, both on-line and off-line. If you don't like these rules, feel free to acquire a different set or even write your own.
What you need to play.
To play RPG, all you need is a Referee and a bunch of people to play the heroes of the story (usually between 3 and 6). But, if you wish to use these rules, get yourself a copy of this rule set, a blank paper sheet for each player, two dices and a pencil, also for each player.
Characterization.
While making an imaginary character is easy and you don't need rules for that, you must adequate the character you imagined to the rules, so that the story can flow without fights between the players because of “irregular” characters that are too strong or too dumb.
In the following pages, up to the section Tests, you will learn how to make a character that doesn't break the rules.
Pick a name and age for the character to start.
Level.
If you play the so-called “electronic RPG” genre of video-games, you are probably familiar with the concept of Level. Level is a number that measures how “strong” a character is. All characters start in the 1st Level. When the Referee decides that the group played enough for a day and that they must pause and continue in the next day, he will judge if the players did a good job during the game. It isn't all about defeating monsters and solving riddles during the story, it's also about playing the role. If the player made the character act according to the personality given to him, then the player role-played well and it also counts. If the player did a good job, the Referee should give his character an amount of experience points ranging from 0 to 9, based on how good he played. This amount piles up with the amount of experience given in the following meetings. Whenever a character earns 10 experience points, he rises to the Second Level. To rise to the Third, you need more 10 experience points (to rise to the fourth, you need more 10 experience points and so on).
Attributes.
When the characterization is happening, each player receives 10 points to freely distribute between the following characteristics:
Fight (abbreviated as Lt).
Body (abbreviated as Cr).
Ego (abbreviated as Eg).
Luck (abbreviated as Sr).
Fight is the general attack and defense skill of the character. If you want a character who is good at fighting, spend a lot of points in Fight.
Body controls everything related to health, strength and other physical capabilities. If you want a robust character, spend a lot of points in Body.
Ego controls everything related to the mind, logic, willpower and even faith. A smart character is supposed to have a lot of points in Ego.
Luck controls everything that isn't covered by the other attributes.
Now, you can't leave an attribute with 0 points. Whenever the character rises a level, the player earns more 4 points to freely distribute on these attributes again, to make his character better.
Composite Values.
Once you decided how many points your character have in each attribute, you must now use some more of your math skills to determine your composite values. These values aren't acquired with points; they depend on the attributes and change whenever your attributes change.
Attack: the attack value of your character, how good he is in offensive fighting. Your attack value is Lt x 5.
Defense: the defense value of your character, how good he is in defensive fighting. Your defense value is Lt x 10.
Damage Meter: it always start as 0. Whenever your character gets hurt, tired or has his body harmed somehow, the Damage Meter rises. If it rises too much, the character might die. See more in Damage Meter.
Damage Cycle: how much your character can resist to pain and injuries. The Damage Cycle is Cr x 10.
Weight-Lifting Capacity: how much weight your character can carry before he starts to feel tired and under pressure. The weight-lifting capacity is Cr x 20 (in kilograms).
Movement: how fast the character moves. The movement value is Cr x 4.
Extension Limit: how many Extensions the character can have. The Extension limit is Eg / 4. If you get a value lower than 1, treat it as 1.
Vitality: general resistance to death and fainting (see Damage Meter). The Vitality value is Cr + Eg.
Money.
If the setting of the story uses some sort of monetary currency, maybe you will need this rule. Of course, we aren't talking about real life money. The character usually starts with an amount of money (in $) of Eg + Sr.
Extensions.
Extensions are things that make your character different of the others. Fighting skill, good health, wits, luck, those things a lot of people have. Extensions are parameters that make your character even more different from the others in the story.
An Extension can be:
A talent that your character born with, such as good memory, good resistance to illnesses.
Knowledge over something, such Psychology or Philosophy.
In essence, an Extension is something that the character can do that most people can not. A character can acquire a new Extension every time it rises a level and when it's created, but it can't have a number of Extensions that goes past it's Extension Limit (see Composite Values). The Extension Limit is Eg / 4, rounded down, but it can't be lower than 1 (if you get a value lower than one, treat it as 1).
How to make Extensions.
Unlike other systems, Fenária RPG doesn't come with a list of Extensions. It would be more efficient to teach the Referee to make his own Extensions and leave them available for the players to choose. It's as easy as filling a form.
Name: the name of the Extension.
Dependencies: Some Extensions can't be acquired by everyone, but just members of certain schools or maybe it requires a special training. Specify if the Extension can be acquired by everyone or if it demands training, for example.
Superficial description: describe how the Extension works from the character's point of view.
Rulings: describe how the Extension works in terms of rules.
Here's an example of Extension:
Philosophy: knowledge over metaphysics, logic, epistemology, ethics and aesthetics. Whenever the character needs to perform an Ego test (see Tests) where knowledge about philosophic tradition is needed, treat your Ego as if it was 10 points higher than what it actually is. Is useful whenever knowledge over philosophic tradition is demanded. Can't be learned if not studied previously.
Appearance and Species.
Maybe your character simply isn't human. Describe how your character looks and what is his species. Like Extensions, different species must be approved by the Referee. The player can propose a new species to Referee's approval or the Referee can come up with a list of available species for the players.
Also like Extensions, Fenária RPG doesn't come with a list of available “races”, so it's, again, up to the Referee to make them up by filling a form.
Name of the species. For example, the “cat-people”.
General description. Using the “cat-people” example, let's say they are mostly cats, with some human attributes, able to walk on two feet, to talk and to think, they are covered in fluffy fur and have long tails, a pair of triangular ears on the top of their heads, they have muzzle with whiskers and even purr when happy.
Advantages. Let's say that most “cat-people”, due to their life style and light build are naturally better at climbing and jumping, compared to the other species, so they earn, for free, the Extensions Climbing and Jumping, even when these Extensions doesn't fit in the Extension Limit.
Flaws. Let's say that most of the “cat-people” tend to be lazy and pragmatic due to cultural environment, which affects their personality to the point where, unless it's extremely necessary, they will always make the choice that demands less effort when faced with a hard decision... not to mention they act weird when exposed to catnip.
Character's Biography.
It isn't extremely necessary, but attributing a life story to the character could make it more vivid and fun to play as. Plus, it can give ideas to the Referee if he decides to make a story based on past events in the character's life, from before he started going into adventures.
Temperament.
The temperament is a “role-play” guide for you. It describes the character's behavior and personality and it will help you to play it's role well. There are four temperament archetypes based on Hippocrates' theory of humors. To decide your character's temperament, pick two archetypes and combine them as you please, to make an unique personality for your character. Of course, this is optional and you could make an entirely new temperament from scratch or the Referee could make his own archetypes for the players to combine.
Sanguine: likes to socialize, is often upbeat and cheerful, is usually careless and irresponsible, tends to speak too much.
Choleric: likes to be in charge, is the one who speaks in name of the group, tends to be too demanding, could become arrogant.
Melancholic: is sensitive to the problems of the others, likes to study and to create, is too self-absorbed, can be easily hurt emotionally.
Phlegmatic: doesn't have a lot of mood swings, reflects before acting, is often apathetic, could be also lazy.
Items and Belongings.
Lastly, no less important, maybe there are weapons available for the characters. Again, there's no ready-to-use list of weapons in Fenária RPG. It's, yet again, up to the Referee to make them up by, again, filling a form.
Name the weapon, of course. It can be a simple name that describes it's nature, such as “sword” or “AK-47” or it can be a meaningful name that refers to it's story, like those weapons named after people who used them or the place where they were forged.
Describe the effect of the weapon, in terms of rules. Usually, the only effect of the weapons is to rise the Attack value or Defense value (see Composite Values) of the character who is using it. It's going to give him advantages when he is fighting (see Combat). But some weapons may have different effects, such as rising another value or inflicting special statuses on the target or user.
Describe how much the weapon weights.
Describe how much it costs or if can even be bought.
Remember, if the character carries too much weight, he might be in trouble. If a character carries more weight than his Weight-Lifting Capacity, his Damage Meter will rise, per second, in an amount equal to the difference between the weight it's trying to carry and the Weight-Lifting Capacity. For example:
I'm trying to carry 110kg while my Weight-Lifting Capacity is 100kg. My Damage Meter will rise 10 points per second (in game time, not in real life time). Plus, in such condition, the Movement of the character becomes 0 (he can still move, but very slowly).
The Characters of the Referee.
Now you learned how the players are supposed to build their characters. However, while each player controls only one character, the Referee controls all other characters in the story: the secondary characters and the villains.
The Referee isn't bound to these rules to make the characters that aren't controlled by the players and can build characters in a completely arbitrary way. However, he must still be fair to the players. The “final boss” of the story may be very strong and powerful, but it doesn't mean that he must be invincible. Also, keep in mind that the heroes are the characters of the players. It's extremely tempting, I know by experience, to make a character that is so powerful that takes away the focus from the actual heroes of the story, even if it's there just to be a helper, but try to not fall in such temptation. Also, the purpose there is to write a story, so the Referee play with the players, but not against the players, even if he is in charge of making up villains that can even kill the characters of the players. It's a matter of being fair.
Level Grinding.
After the characters are ready, the Referee can start the storytelling and the players can start the role-playing. Once the playtime is over, the Referee judges if the players did a good job or not. If yes, their characters will receive an amount of experience ranging from 0 to 9 and maybe rise a level (see Level), earning more 4 points to distribute in the attributes and a new Extension, if possible. If not... no experience!
Tests.
So, the Referee is telling his story. There's a point in the story where the character of one of the players must jump over a cliff and decide to try it, in spite of possible consequences. Now, the Referee isn't sure if that character really can do that, so he can't say bluntly if the character was successful or not.
Whenever the Referee isn't sure if the action is succeed or not, a test is necessary. That's why we need dices to play. First, the Referee attributes a number to the difficulty of the task. It can be any number, ranging from 0 to infinite. Then, the player of the character must roll two dices. The smaller number will be the “dozen” and the higher will be the “unit”. So, if your character is trying to swim against a very strong tide and the dices rolled 4 and 5, the result of the dice roll (abbreviated as R) is 45.
Once you get the R, add to it the value that is relevant to the situation.
If you are attacking, then it's an Attack Roll (see Combat).
If you are trying a physical task (swimming, jumping, running, enduring weather or pain or another task that demand physical effort), it's a Body Test, so you add your Cr value (see Attributes) to the R.
If you are trying a mental task (studying something hard, hearing a very subtle noise, resisting to hypnosis, casting a magic or another task that demand mental effort), it's an Ego Test, so you add your Eg value to the R.
If what you are trying isn't something that depend on your body or mind, but rather depends on pure luck, it's a Luck Test, obviously, so you add your Sr value to the R.
If your character's Damage Meter rise too much, then you might need to perform a Vitality Test (see Damage Meter).
Then, once you have added the relevant value to the R, you get a final number that is compared to the difficulty number imposed by the Referee. If the result is higher than the difficulty number, the character was successful in his task. If not, the character failed. If it's a tie, the Referee will decide if the character is successful or not.
Example:
My character is running from a bunch of hunters that are chasing him through a forest. During his mad run, he sees a large river. I then have an idea and tell the Referee that my character will climb a tree and then jump over the river. That way, the hunters won't be able to catch him. The Referee approves and imposes a difficulty number of 43 to the task of climbing the tree, a difficulty number of 23 to see if my character doesn't vacillate and a difficulty number of 75 to see if the character actually jumps far enough. I roll the dices and get a 5 and 6. My R was 56. Then I add my Cr value, that is 3, to the R, getting a total of 59. The difficulty of climbing the tree was 43, so I passed. The Referee says that my character grabbed the tree trunk and began climbing as fast as he could, convicted that his idea would work, while the hunters had to leave their horses to climb after me. The Referee makes Body Tests for the hunters, two of them passing, one of them failing. So, one of the hunters, unable to climb, was left on the ground, while the other two kept chasing my character. Once my character is on the top of the tree, I roll the dices again, getting 2 and 1, so my R is 12. Adding to my Eg value, that is 4, I get a result of 16. My character vacillates and suddenly feels unsure if it's the right thing to do, feeling a bit dizzy from how high he is from the ground. With hunters right behind him, I must think on something else. I ask to the Referee if there's a vine my character can use to swing to the other side. He says there is. I say that my character is going to use it to land on the other side safely, rather than jumping straight from tree to ground. He attributes a difficulty level of 35 and say it's a Luck Test, since my character isn't sure if the vine is safe, nor have time to check. I roll the dices, getting 4 and 5, so 45 (since I have no Extension that can be applied there), plus my Sr, that is 1. I get a result of 46, more than enough to pass the test. The Referee says that my character grabbed the vine and swung his way to the other side, landing on another tree, a smaller one. The Referee also said that the hunters call it quits, after seeing what my character did and being unwilling to doing the same...
Remember that tests are only necessary if the success or failure is not certain. Tests are not needed when the success or failure is obvious.
Automatic Success and Automatic Failure.
When you roll a test and get 6 and 6 (R = 66) in the dices, the character is automatically successful, no matter how high the difficulty is or how small is the value that he was supposed to add to the R. On the other hand, when you roll a test and get 1 and 1 (R = 11) in the dices, then it's an instant failure and the character failed at it's task, no matter how easy it was or how good he is at said task.
Combat.
Now, the combat rules, that should be applied whenever characters fight. In games of epic nature, combats are a big part of it, the clash between the heroes and the villains, the heroes and the everyday foes or even between the heroes themselves for whatever reason.
To explain how combat works, I'll describe the “turn”. When a fight is about to happen, the Referee must check the Movement value (see Composite Values) of every character that would be involved. The turn structure is then built from the one who has the highest Movement value to the one with the lowest. For example, there are three characters who are about to fight, one of them with Movement 6, the other with Movement 3 and the last one with Movement 12. The one with Movement 12 will have the first turn to act, the one with Movement 6 will have the second turn and the one with Movement 3 will be the last one to act. Thankfully, we don't need to explain this in all it's details and provide examples with long descriptions, because Game Industry has provided great examples of this in turn-based games. Just in case of you not being too attached to video-games, let's say it's like a board game in which every character will have their turn to act, the one with highest Movement (the “fastest”) will act first, followed by the one with second highest Movement and so on, until the one with lowest Movement acts.
Let's suppose it's your turn. In your turn, you will follow these steps:
1. Choose what your character will do in it's turn. It can attack, it can use or prepare an item, it can focus to use some spell... It has to do something. Once decided, the Referee tells what happened and decides if the turn ends there and then. But, if the character is going to attack another character, then you follow to the second step.
2. If the character is going to attack another character, then perform an Attack Roll(see Tests), but the difficulty number is determined by the Defense value (see Composite Values) of the character that is being attacked. You roll two dices and add the Attack value of your character to the R. So, if your character attacks another character with Defense 20, you must have a resulting Attack Roll (that is, R+Attack) higher than 20 to make your character hit the other character. If you pass, the character hits the other, dealing damage. If not, the target either dodged or blocked the attack, depending on the description the Referee makes up. If an automatic success (see Automatic Success and Automatic Failure) happens during an Attack Roll, the Defense of the targeted character is ignored. If the attack hit and dealt damage, follow to the next step.
3. Time to calculate how much damage the other character took. The damage is the difference between the resulting Attack Roll and the Defense of the targeted character. So, an Attack Roll that resulted in 19 against a Defense of 8 deals 11 damage points that are added to the targeted character's Damage Meter (see Damage Meter). If the Attack Roll was an automatic success, then the Defense of the targeted character is ignored, so the damage dealt is equal to the resulting Attack Roll, as if the attacking character hit a target with Defense 0.
4. If the attack hit, the character can attack again, up to a number of times that doesn't exceed Movement / 10 (rounded down). So, a character with Movement 20 can attack up to 2 times. If the character attacks again, re-do the steps from the first (except that the next action must be an attack, so you can't attack and use the additional action to run or to focus or to use an item, for example). Even if the Movement of the character is 50, it can't attack five times: the number of attacks in a turn can never exceed four, even if the Movement could allow so. Once the character is done attacking, it's turn ends. Also, if it does something in it's turn that isn't an attack, it can't attack in that turn.
5. Now, it's the turn of the next character, whose player will do these same steps. When all characters have their turns, the cycle starts again from the first character until the battle ends.
There are also special rules:
When deciding what your character will do, you can make him prepare a counterattack. If you do, your turn ends immediately. But, whenever a character attacks your's and fails to beat your character's Defense value, your character can have a free attack against the character that attacked. This attack ignores the Defense of the targeted character and deals damage equal to the Attack value (see Composite Values) of the attacking character (there's no dice-roll). It stands for every character that attacks yours and fails to beat it's Defense value, but ends when it's your character's turn again. To keep using counterattacks, the player must say in all of his character's turns that his or her character is going to counterattack.
Also when deciding what your character will do, you can make it try to grab the opponent. To do so, perform an Attack Roll. If your character beats the Defense value of the opponent, then the opponent was grabbed. The damage of this action is divided by five and rounded down if necessary. If a character is being “hugged”, is coiled or has it's movements limited in any way, it's Defense falls accordingly. If it's unable to dodge or to block (either) an attack, then it's Defense and Movement is cut in half (altering it's position in the turn chain). If it's unable to dodge and to block (both), the Defense and Movement falls to 0 (again, altering it's position in the turn chain). Of course, it lasts only while it's movements are limited.
Damage Meter.
Fights, weather, injuries, poisoning... everything that harms a character's body makes it's Damage Meter rise. When the Damage Meter rises too much, the character may face serious risks, such as fainting or even death.
The character has two key values that work with the Damage Meter: the Vitality and the Damage Cycle (see Composite Values). Whenever the Damage Meter goes past the number in the Damage Cycle, you must perform a Vitality Test (see Tests). This test is “automatic”, it's difficulty number isn't decided by the Referee.
Let's suppose that my character has a Damage Cycle of 20 and took 5 damage points (rising the Damage Meter to 5), then took 10 more (15), then 11 more (rising to 26). The Damage Meter went past my Damage Cycle, that is 20, so I'll perform a test against fainting. In this case, the difficulty of the test is equal to the character's current Damage Meter – my Damage Cycle. In the example I gave,  my character's Damage Meter is 26 and my Damage Cycle is 20, the difficulty of the test is 6. If the character passes the test, then it will be fine for now. If not, it faints. However, if the character passed the test, it must repeat it whenever it receives more damage. For example, if my character's Damage Cycle is 20, my Damage Meter rises to 26, I roll the Vitality Test and pass, I'll have to repeat the test whenever my Damage Meter rises more. Let's suppose that my character's Damage Meter rises to 54 after the last attack it received, the difficulty of the test will be 54 – 20 (my Damage Cycle), that is, 34. So, the more damage your character take, the harder it will be for it to stay up. While fainted, the character will die if it receives an obviously mortal hit, since it won't be able to defend itself. Also, if you get an automatic failure (see Automatic Success and Automatic Failure) in the Vitality Test to avoid fainting, you character also dies. Once the Damage Meter goes below the Damage Cycle again, the character has recovered and won't need to do Vitality Tests to avoid fainting until it's Damage Meter goes past the Damage Cycle again. While fainted, the character wakes up once it's Damage Meter lowers in at least 1 point.
Notice that, in Fenária RPG, there are no hit points. It means that a character can stay fighting forever if it's player keep getting excellent results in the dices (see Automatic Success and Automatic Failure). But it demands extremely high composite values and an absurd amount of luck.
The Damage Meter goes down with healing measures and resting. After resting for eight hours straight, a character's Damage Meter is divided by the number stated in it's Cr (rounded down). If the Damage Meter of a fainted character goes down in at least one point, it wakes up.
Notice that a character can faint for very silly reasons, if his damage meter goes too high with something like a stab on the leg. It isn't enough to faint someone. So, if it's illogical that a character faints due to the nature of the attack, the Referee can say that it hurt so bad that the character becomes “useless” (rolling on the floor and moaning, for example) until his damage meter goes down in at least one point (meaning that the pain ceased or became bearable).
What if my character dies?
You, of course, won't need to die for real nor be banned from the game forever. But will need to build a new character from scratch (see Characterization).
Referee's “instinct”.
To end this rule set, I'll talk about this thing called “Referee's instinct”. What if something happens in the game and there are no rules for that? What if there are no rules for magic, giant robots or some other element that your story needs? The Referee then can make up rules for these things. Made-up rules are welcome, as long the Referee keeps the game fair and funny for the players.
Appendix A: Sample Species.
Here's some sample species to be used by the Referee as he pleases. Now, the following species are anthropomorphic, they are animals with some human attributes. These human attributes can be selected by the player who desires their character to be part of that species. Take this as description:
“An anthropomorphic animal.”
Now, each species has their own modifiers (bonuses and penalties on attributes), advantages and disadvantages. Some bonuses and penalties refer to Extensions that the species can acquire easier (or not acquire at all). To see those Extensions, see the Appendix B.
Ox.
+2 in Body and +1 in Fight. Can acquire Courage ignoring the dependencies.
-2 in Ego. Can never acquire Climbing or Acrobat.
Dog.
+1 in Body. Can acquire Sensory Skill ignoring the dependencies.
-1 in Ego.
Sheep.
+2 in Fight.
Can never acquire Climbing or Land on Your Feet.
Cat.
+1 in Ego, +1 in Luck. Can acquire Land on Your Feet and Sixth Sense ignoring the dependencies.
- 2 in Body. Can not acquire Build or Tech Savvy without Ego 8 at least.
Rabbit.
+1 in Body, +1 in Luck. Can acquire “Cute” ignoring the dependencies.
-1 in Fight. Can never acquire See in the Darkness.
Raccoon.
+1 in Body, +1 in Ego.
-2 Fight.
Mouse.
+2 in Fight.
-2 in Body. Can never acquire Courage.
Fox.
+1 in Body, +1 in Ego. Can acquire Beauty ignoring the dependencies.
-1 in Fight.
Appendix B: Sample Extensions.
Here's some sample Extensions to be used by the Referee as he pleases. It doesn't take away his freedom to build his own Extensions.
Acrobat.
Dependencies: -.
The character is really good at performing dangerous leaps.  The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) whenever a jump-based is needed.
Affinities.
Dependencies: -.
The character has a bond with a element of nature. Such bond is so strong that he is able to interact with said element as if interacting with his own body. The player much specify that element (Light, Fire, Air, Earth, Water, Ether) when acquiring this Extension. To have an affinity with Light and Fire, for example, the player would have to acquire this Extension twice. Affinities are pure dependencies and have no utility aside of enabling the player to get Extensions that depend on them.
Beauty.
Dependencies: the character must spend time with his appearance every day.
The character has an excellent appearance. Maybe his body is strong and well-toned, maybe his hair has a singular aesthetic magnetism, maybe he got an angel face and a hypnotic smile, or even all of these. What matters is that the character is beautiful enough to influence the judgment that other characters build of him. Unless the character does something obviously bad in front of someone, no one will consider him an enemy or bad person. To convince someone who doesn't know the character that he isn't an ally (if he in fact is not) requires an Ego test against the Body or Ego (whatever is higher) of the accused.
“Cute”.
Dependencies: must be child or woman.
It's like Beauty, but, instead of uncommon beauty, the character is simply “funny”, “cute”. He attracts for showing himself as defenseless or infantile. Unless the character does something obviously bad in front of someone, no one will consider him an enemy or bad person. To convince someone who doesn't know the character that he isn't an ally (if he in fact is not) requires an Ego test against the Body or Ego (whatever is higher) of the accused.
Courage.
Dependencies: must be the first Extension to be acquired by the player.
The character is very courageous, laughing on the danger's face. The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) whenever a courage-based test is demanded.
Land on Your Feet.
Dependencies: Acrobat.
While falling, the character can spin his body and land on his feet! While falling, do a Body Test with difficulty 40. If you pass, the damage that the landing was supposed to deal is cut in half (rounded down).
Sing.
Dependencies: must be the first Extension to be acquired by the player.
The character has a natural talent to singing. His voice is marvelous. The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) whenever a voice-based test is demanded.
Build.
Dependencies: Tech Savvy (any).
The character is able to build, mount, make certain devices or mechanisms. He is only able to build a device which he is good at operating (that is, if he is a Tech Savvy in that device). It means that a character who got the Extensions Tech Savvy: Clocks, Tech Savvy: Guns and Tech Savvy: Cars can not build anything that isn't a clock, a gun or a car. The player must acquire this Extension whenever he wants to build a different device or mechanism. It means that a character with Tech Savvy: Clocks, Tech Savvy: Guns and Tech Savvy: Cars can have also Build: Clocks, Build: Guns and Build: Cars, but would need to acquire this Extension three times.
Climb.
Dependencies: -.
The character is able to climb easily on any surface that can be climbed. The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) whenever a test is demanded for climbing.
Balance.
Dependencies: -.
The character is very good on balancing things on balancing himself in dangerous situations. The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) whenever a balance-based test is demanded.
Furtive.
Dependencies: -.
The character is good at hiding his location and following someone without being spotted.  The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) whenever a test is demanded for hiding or following furtively. The character, obviously, can't hide himself if there's nowhere to hide.
Sensory Skill.
Dependencies: Ego 2.
The character's senses are very sensitive. The player must specify which of the character's senses (sight, hearing, tact and so on) is so sensitive. The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) whenever a test based on that sense is demanded. Each sense that the player wants to improve must be acquired separately. So, the character can have improved vision and hearing, but would need to acquire this Extension twice.
Languages.
Dependencies: the character must spend at least six months studying the language it wants to learn.
The character speaks more than one language. This Extension isn't needed to comprehend the character's first language, obviously, but is needed if the character wants to speak two of more languages. Without this Extension, communication through words between characters who speak different languages is impossible. Each language must be acquired separately. So, a character who speaks Portuguese as first language and wants to learn English and Spanish, must acquire this Extension two times (one for English and one for Spanish, and must resolve the dependencies twice, that is, spend six months learning each language).
Gambling.
Dependencies: Luck 2.
The character is good at gambling.  The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) whenever a test is demanded for gambling games.
Weapons.
Dependencies: -.
The character is good at fighting with a specified weapon. The player must specify which weapon the character is good at using when he acquires this Extension. A character can have Weapons: Swords and Weapons: Pistols, but the player must acquire this Extension twice, for example.  The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) in every Attack Roll (see Combat), as long the character is using the specified weapon to attack.
Disarmed Combat.
Dependencies: -.
The character is good at fighting without weapons.  The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) in every Attack Roll (see Combat) as long the character isn't using any weapon to attack.
Medicine.
Dependencies: Ego 8.
The character knows medical procedures. He can heal wounds and illnesses as long he can find the needed materials. To heal, roll an Ego test with difficulty 50. If you have success, subtract 50 from the overall result. The difference is the amount of damage points that were reduced from the damage meter of the character who received the treatment. Every test like this takes one hour in game time. If it's an illness or an surgical operation, the character can only be considered “cured” if the whole damage meter is reduced to 0 through the procedures. If a character is ill and said illness inflicted him 80 damage points so far, he can only be considered cured if Medicine healed him from all those 80 points. If not, the illness continues to affect the character. If a character received 65 damage points due to appendicitis, he will still receive damage from it until Medicine has healed him from all those points of damage. Supposing that the character is unable to heal all those points, the operation or treatment will be left incomplete, which can be much worse than the original illness or wound.
Lie.
Dependencies: Ego 2.
The character is good at convincing people of something that isn't true. The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) in every test related to lying.
Swimming.
Dependencies: Body 2.
The character... can swim. What did you expect? The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) in every swimming-related test.
Fast Reflex.
Dependencies: Fight 4.
While fighting, the character is able to counterattack with great speed. Allows the character to counterattack (see Combat) low-range disarmed attacks even if the attack hits and deals damage.
Stealing!
Dependencies: Body 2 and Ego 2.
The character can easily take something from someone without being spotted. The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) in every test related to stealing.
Sixth Sense.
Dependencies: Luck 4.
The characters can sense that something bad is about to happen in a certain place and even point details of what might happen. When the character enter a dangerous locality, that is, a place where the Referee wants something bad to happen, roll an Ego or Luck test (whatever is higher) with difficulty 50. If passed, the character not only “feels” that place is hostile, but also notice things that could be dangerous (an iron bar hanging from a chain, but sustained by a low-quality hook, something that a normal character wouldn't notice), even if such things look harmless in nature (a cup of water on a computer desk).
Survival.
Dependencies: Ego 4.
The character can “get away” with natural materials found in the wild. He can find food by himself, elect of make good shelters, predict changes in the weather, find potable water and animals to hunt. When away from civilization, the character can try to find water, food or shelter and then perform the proper procedure. When he finds water, he must roll an Ego Test with difficulty 50. Success means that he can say for sure if that water is potable of not, if that isn't obvious. Same goes for when he finds food, such as mushrooms, a success in the test enables him to say if the food can be eaten or if it's poisonous. He can't repeat the test if he fails (at least, not in the same day). As for shelter, the test is the same, but he can repeat. Every attempt at building a shelter takes thirty minutes. Of course he can only build shelter if he got the materials to do so.
Tech Savvy.
Dependencies: Ego 2.
The character can understand how some mechanisms work. Doesn't mean it born knowing, but that he has a natural curiosity towards machines and finds it easy to operate them. The character must specify the kind of mechanism the character is good at fiddling with (computer, clock and so on). The dice roll is inverted (the dozen will be higher number and the unity will be the lowest, see Tests) whenever a test based on that machine is demanded. The player must acquire this Extension again whenever he wants to receive these benefits for a different machine. This way, he can be good at operating computers and fixing clocks, but would need to acquire this Extension twice, one for each device.
See in the Darkness.
Dependencies: Sensory Skill: Sight.
The character's eyes easily adapt to darkness. If the darkness of a place offers him any penalties in any test, the character is unaffected by them. Notice this Extension doesn't work in complete darkness, but only in partial darkness, as long there's at least some light. If there's no light at all, the character obviously can not guide itself with his eyes.
License.
Este trabalho foi licenciado com a Licença Creative Commons Atribuição  3.0 Não Adaptada. Para ver uma cópia desta licença, visite http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ ou envie um pedido por carta para Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA.
Yure T. Kitten
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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System that I made up to play with my group. Unfortunately, I moved away from them, so the system was dying. Frustrated, I translated it to English in hopes that someone uses it for something.

Keywords
rpg 1,104, tabletop 189
Details
Type: Writing - Document
Published: 5 years, 9 months ago
Rating: General

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Khzhak
5 years, 9 months ago
Interesting...now to read it.

Just a few questions that aren't answered in it.

so why is fight Lt, body Cr, and luck Sr?
how is someone's skill limit determined?
grapple is divided by five.  round up or down? closest?  truncated integer?

I clicked on this right before I left to go across town for the evening, so it's seven hours later I'm finally posting this.  I may edit depending on other people's responses that preceded mine.
Khzhak
5 years, 9 months ago
...or I'm still first to respond.  Firsties!
Reizinho
5 years, 9 months ago
Good kid.
Reizinho
5 years, 9 months ago
In the Portuguese version of GURPS, Strenght is still ST, Intelligence is still IQ, even if in Portuguese these words translate as "Força" and "Inteligência". The abbreviations didn't change to For or Int, like it happened in the d20 translations. I thought it would be fine to keep the abbreviations like in the original.
Skill Limit is determined by dividing Eg by 4. If it's a value lower than 1, it's treated as 1.
All decimals and fractions are rounded down. I didn't write there because I was unsure if I was really supposed to translate "arredondado" as "rounded".
Centende
5 years, 9 months ago
Sounds fun XD I don't have enough warm bodies to prop up to play with though XD
Reizinho
5 years, 9 months ago
That's the biggest problem.3:
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