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The Woodcarver's Geis
coyote_folk_song.rtf
Keywords rabbit 71054, raccoon 21876, coyote 6705, music 6486, song 1055, ermine 457, dusky 223, ballad 52, stu 42, winterfur 36, baksrit 15, folk song 3, tales of winterfur 2, mouse opossum 2, kyrinn 2
© 2010 Marvin E. Fuller

     One of the traders began strumming her mandolin while her companion tuned up his matching lute.  A hush fell over the group as the two coyotes began to sing, their voices ululating into the night.

    "I went a-walkin' one fine morn, to the market for my buns.
    "Who did I meet, but the Baker boy, kneadin' his dough,
    "And his fair sister, little Molly Dapplespot, teasin' the boys,
    "Tossin' her tail and risin' in the summer's heat.

    "Owoo!  Owoo!  Little Dapplespot, doo.
    "Watch the tail, see a boy don't tug it,
    "Or your daughter will be teasin' the boys 'fore too long.
    "Owoo!  Owoo!  Little Dapplespot, doo.

    "I went a-walkin' one fine noon, to the market for my meat.
    "Who did I see, but the Butcher boy, whackin' his vittles.
    "And his little girl, young Sally Dillydot, round as an apple,
    "Stampin' her feet and stuffed through the giblets.

    "Owoo!  Owoo!  Young Dillydot, doo.
    "Watch the feet, see a boy don't dance them,
    "Or your daughter will be round as rosy fruit 'fore too long.
    "Owoo!  Owoo!  Young Dillydot, doo.

    "I went a-walkin' one fine eve, to the market for my sticks.
    "Who did I meet, but the Candle-Maker, waxin' his taper,
    "And his bonny lass, sweet Jilly Dottlebot, cradlin' her babe,
    "Barin' her shoulder and wick'd no longer."

    "Owoo!  Owoo!  Young Dottlebot, doo.
    "Watch the shoulder, see a boy don't hug it,
    "'Cause your daughter will be cradlin' a babe 'fore too long.
    "Owoo!  Owoo!  Young Dottlebot, doo."


     Appreciative whistles and applause complimented the duo once they finished.
     "They're good, aren't they?" remarked Dusky.  "We've traveled with them since Gallowglen.  They make a fine pair."
     "Heh, sure are.  That's a good song," agreed Kyrinn, laughing appreciatively.  "Maybe this isn't as bad as I feared 'twould be."
     "Told you," Baksrit said.
     "I still think it's inappropriate," grumbled someone nearby.  Baksrit cast a glance at the rabbit monk.
     "Now, now, Stu," chided Dusky, paternally.  "It's only inappropriate because you're thinking dirty."  Stu flicked his ears in embarrassment, letting the raccoon have his point.  Baksrit ran the song through her head again, but didn't quite see what was so improper about it.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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First in pool
Happy Norther 2010!
Deidrei - Artistic Enigma
The Woodcarver's Geis
What's this?  You mean I can write, too? :o

Coyote Folk Song is from the second novel, Isen's Bane.  At this point in the story, Baksrit and an Artemin mouse opossum named Kyrinn have stopped at a traders' camp for the night.  There, two coyotes prepare to sing a folk song.

This particular snippet is one of my dad's favorite parts of both novels because of an extra layer of meaning he caught in the first draft.  When he brought it to my attention, I revised this section to further build upon that meaning.  As strange as it may seem, I didn't originally intend for that extra layer of meaning to be there.

The two coyotes' song was inspired by actual English and Irish folk songs sung by street musicians.  Another inspiration was the nursery rhyme "Rub-a-dub-dub" (an early 1825 version is shown below):

"     "Hey! rub-a-dub, ho! rub-a-dub, three maids in a tub,
    "And who do you think were there?
    "The butcher, the baker, the candlestick-maker,
    "And all of them gone to the fair."


As for the extra layer of meaning, I'll let you figure that one out.

Story © 2010 Marvin E. Fuller

Keywords
rabbit 71,054, raccoon 21,876, coyote 6,705, music 6,486, song 1,055, ermine 457, dusky 223, ballad 52, stu 42, winterfur 36, baksrit 15, folk song 3, tales of winterfur 2, mouse opossum 2, kyrinn 2
Details
Type: Writing - Document
Published: 8 years, 7 months ago
Rating: General

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dmfalk
8 years, 7 months ago
*grin* Such a naughty little song.... ;)

d.m.f.
CyberCornEntropic
8 years, 7 months ago
I take it you caught the "extra layer of meaning"? ;p
dmfalk
8 years, 7 months ago
Enough to know that this should've been an M or A-rated story, but that would be giving it away, my guess. ;)

d.m.f.
CyberCornEntropic
8 years, 7 months ago
In which case, you'd be the first person (outside of my dad) to catch it.  Both DeviantArt and FurAffinity didn't seem to mind it being G-rated.  Then again this sort of thing is a good example of "Getting Crap Past the Radar". :p
dmfalk
8 years, 7 months ago
I wouldn't call it "crap"-- Sexual innuendo and euphemisms were quite common in traditional folk music, it's appropos... But I'm also not all that surprised that others don't see it, since we're too blunt these days in expressing things of this nature, or even capable of seeing the humour in it.

It would be interesting hearing someone put this to music, though.

d.m.f.
CyberCornEntropic
8 years, 7 months ago
Well, when I "swear" (even if it's something really mild), it's typically because one of my characters is saying it or I'm referencing something.  In this case, I was referencing the TV Tropes page with the same name.  Even so, I suspect the vast majority of people don't realize just how dirty the folk song could be interpreted.  I didn't even realize it until my dad pointed it out (and he approved of it).

I agree it would be interesting to actually hear how well this translates into song (as well as the opinion of a musician well versed in this sort of ballad).  I specifically want the music to be a traditional Irish or British folk song with musical accompaniment as that's how I envisioned it, using similar songs from a couple CDs I have.  The coyotes mentioned here are a young husband and wife musicians and entertainers with Irish accents (her name was established as Colleen, but his wasn't mentioned).
dmfalk
8 years, 7 months ago
Definitely English folk music- It just didn't fit the styles more common with Irish, Welsh, Manx or Scots folk music as I was reading it. :) But yeah, it would be great to find someone versed in folk music of the British Isles to attempt interpreting this to song. :) There are a few in furry, but I can't think of any right off. Could always ask in the music forum at FA Forums- Someone would know! :)

My own use of language is much the same way-- It strongly depends on context, rather than as punctuation. :) (One of the ironic challenges in writing my two Tiny Toons sex stories was not to use a single crass word or expletive, and keep it creative. :) )

d.m.f.
CyberCornEntropic
8 years, 7 months ago
I'd also want their opinion on how to revise the songs so that they sounded better, especially when it comes to revising the other songs I've come up with.  One is a love ballad performed by buskers, another is an Artemin singing, and the third is Colleen performing another folk song that helps move the plot along.

Although I'm not one for erotica, I still have to be impressed that you managed to write two such stories without using a single bit of foul language.  All too often, writers think that using profanity is shorthand for "darker and edgier" or "mature".  More often than not, the profanity just causes character derailment and hurts the suspension of disbelief.
dmfalk
8 years, 7 months ago
Not to mention that the common notion of using profanity is "de rigeur" if one is to write any sex story.

For me, writing a sex story, or any story like that (not counting nightmares, which fortunately I haven't committed to bits and bytes) is meant, first and foremost, to be fun. The two TTA sex stories, particularly the first, were meant as challenges, not just for myself (which I mentioned), but to others, in that I wanted to challenge the notion of not just the sex story, but sexuality itself, as being something sinful or to be ashamed of, or even thought of as "naughty". I hope to continue that challenge as long as I can write any story. :)

As for the lyrics, I'd agree, that it would be good to have the lyrics checked for workability for appropriate folk songs by someone familiar with the genre.

d.m.f.
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