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Creative Writing Story: Intro

creative_writing.txt
Keywords human 81610, sci-fi 3703, future 1049, dystopian 26, pollution 24
December 31, 2049

As the last rocket launched to leave the planet, Captain John Koch stood by from the observation deck, as he watched the final rocket carrying the last members of the human race to call earth their home, leave the planet for good. This was the very last transport.

Koch and a small team of approximately 400 other scientists remained to last humans on earth. All of them would be sent off to one of 21 bases around the planet, in orbit and on the moon where change was needed or teams were needed for transport. This team of 400 had one job: to return the planet to a state where humanity could return to it after several hundred years in deep space, and perfected green technology. All 12 billion members of humanity were kept on board this ship.

The ship, had many names, The UNS Diligent, the Human Population Carrier, or Noah’s Ark. The Diligent was humanity’s greatest achievement. It had taken 20 years to build, came it at over 1,600 meters tall, over 5,000 meters from bow to stern, over 3,000 meters wide at its widest, and could fit all of humanity inside one neat organized package. On top of that, it even supported all of humanity’s domesticated pet population, save for the remaining researcher’s pets. As a precaution, the Diligent would check in every 24 hours with the Researcher’s still on the ground.

“The diligent should be checking in approximately 1 hour 30 minutes, sir.”

“When they do, put it on the Main screen.”

“Sir the Diligent is hailing us now”

“Put it up.”

An image appeared on the window, where you could previously see the launch.

“Captain Koch, can we confirm the last ship is up and on its way to rendezvous with us now?”

“Yes sir, The Shuttle Enterprise just launched for you now. You should see it on your radar now.”

“Ah yes we’ve got it. It just left the atmosphere. It should be inrange of the tractor beam any second now,” The Admiral turned to face someone off screen. “As soon as that ship is in range, tractor it into the vehicle bay, and jump to warp 1 away from Earth.” The shuttle enterprise soon entered range of the Diligent’s tractor beam, and was brought into the vehicle bay. The Diligent’s shields raised and the communication was ended and the ship disappeared from the orbital radar.

In a moment of celebration, Koch gave a short speech to motivate his team, and off they went to their assigned locations. At the main base they could only transport on team at a time and each satellite base could only transport 6 at one time, After nearly 10 minutes, it was time for the final transport. Captain Koch and his team stepped onto on the transporter pad to be taken to the cold remote base in Antarctica.

“Ready when you are, sir.” the pad operator said.

“Ready” Koch responded.

A light began to appear from the transport pad and envelope each person, and each member of the crew was whisked away to their destination

=====================================================

Captains Log
March 30, 2053

Its been 3 years since the Diligent has left Earth and minimal progress has been made. Humanity had completely decimated the planet, and the amount of waste left behind is astounding. At least all of this is going back into humanities resource storage on the moon. All of the waste we are collecting is far too much for the transporters to successfully beam to the moon without being completely burnt out, so we’re using China’s space elevator. It occasionally needs repairs but works fairly well.

I currently have a team running missions back and forth from the space elevator to the moon and two teams on the moon one building the new lunar space elevator, and the other maintaining the storage facility. The new space elevator is expected to be finished with in the next month, And I’m very eager for the completion. Overall the operation appears to be successful.

End Log

=====================================================

Main base Control, Houston, Texas

A voice sounded over the comm, “Sir, the latest shipment of resources has arrived on the moon, and has been unloaded successfully, The moon team is departing shortly.”

“Good. Is there anything else?” the captain inquired.

“No sir.”

“Good. Inform the ORB that I’ll be making a trip up there to check progress.”

“Aye, sir”

Within a few hours, the Captain was on several hour long trip to space. It was easiest way, to get to the station as the station was 42,000 km above the earth’s surface. Over 10 times higher than the range of any transporters.

After several hours of riding in the car, he finally reached the orbital station. He was no weightless and was floating in the elevator car. Pushed off of his seat in the direction of the exit. He put his helmet on and opened the hatch slowly, as to prevent rapid depressurization. Upon exiting the elevator he entered the station and went to check on the status of the trash collection.

The station had four sides, the ship docking side, and the crew habitation side, the control room, and the resource storage side. Currently he was docked on the end of the vessel docking side. The docking bas was a long corridor with occasional hatches for where the transport vessels are stationed when not in use or are being loaded. At the end of the corridor, was the main control room.

He entered the room, ensuring the hatch behind him was sealed and checked on the percentage complete on a nearby console. 4.7973% complete, the console read. He was disappointed. He had expected at least 5% by now. At this rate, the planet would be habitable by 2125. He was hoping that they would be done by the end of the century, but that goal was quite lofty. He sighed in disappointment.

He reopened the hatch slowly, to go to the crew rest area. As he passed through the hatches, a vessel was docking. He entered the rest area and closed the hatch behind him.

Suddenly a large bang was heard, and alarms immediately followed. He looked at the ship corridor only to see lots of floating debris and ship remnants, floating in the corridor. He attempted to open the hatch to the docking bay, but the hatch was magnetically sealed by the computer. The station quickly stabilized themselves as the debris floated away in random directions. The ship however was unable to stabilize itself as the entire lower front deck had been destroyed. He needed to get out there.

He turned around and went to the central hub and went to the emergency airlock. Put on his EV suit and went out.

Now outside and in harm’s way, he tried to radio the ship, but there was no response. The secondary airlock appeared undamaged, so he decided to try his luck and try to enter there. The airlock was still functional, so he entered and repressurized it as quickly as possible.

He entered the ship only to find no sign of the crew. The crew was either incapacitated, dead or had left the ship already. He floated his way to the bridge since the artificial gravity failed. He reached the entrance hatch and opened it carefully. Unexpectedly, All the air in the room was nearly sucked out before the computer resealed the door.

Koch looked through the window and saw the two astronauts on the bridge in their pressure suits, but were completely unconscious and floating in a vacuum.

“Computer, Is it possible to repressurize the bridge?”

“Affirmative”

“Match the pressure on the bridge to the pressure in this room.” Koch said putting on his helmet.

Suddenly, the bridge filled with a white gas as it repressurized. Debris began to float away from the gas as the door opened. Koch entered quickly and grabbed the two astronauts floating in the bridge and fled just as quickly. The door sealed behind them, just as the front of the bridge flew out away from the ship.

“Computer, repressurize this room.”

“Unable to authorize command. Structural integrity is below threshold for room pressurization.”

“Dammit!” Koch shouted

“Ugh,” an astronaut groaned “Where… Where’s my helmet?”

“Doesn’t matter. Are you ok, Lieutenant?”

“I… I think so”

“Good. Let's get you and the commander here a new helmet.”

Koch grabbed two emergency helmets from the emergency storage compartment and gave one to the commander, and put the other on the unconscious astronaut, and then took the   both of them to safety on board the station.

=====================================================

 “Computer activate the artificial gravity on my mark.” Captain Koch ordered as he and the Lieutenant secured the Commander to the MedBed™. The captain and commander and captain centered themselves on the isle way on the wall of the MedBay.

“Engage.” The Room began to spin and everything began to get pressed against the wall. The room spun faster up until it felt like the gravity on earth.

“Computer, diagnosis.”

“The commander is suffering hypoxia, internal bleeding, and has several possibly broken bones. Further testing is required.”

 “We won’t be able to do anything.”

=====================================================

Captains Log
April 2, 2053

We’ve lost a valuable crew member. Commander Yar has been killed in a tragic accident. Everyone, especially her team, is deeply saddened by her loss. Unfortunately, Commander Yar will not be able to see an end to her Job.

End Log

=====================================================

U.N.S.S. DILIGENT
APRIL 5, 2053
FROM: EARTH MAIN BASE
TO: U.N.S.S. DILIGENT
DATE: 15323.44

BEGIN TRANSMISSION

“Hello, This is the Captain of the team that stayed behind on Earth. We are sending this message asking for recruits. Anyone that wishes to come and assist in the reconstruction and purification of earth is welcome to apply to return to earth. And this process will happen over a long period of time and will be decades of hard work, but will be very gratifying to see the Earth restored to its original state. If you want a position, please apply.

Captain Koch out.”

END OF TRANSMISSION
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Keywords
human 81,610, sci-fi 3,703, future 1,049, dystopian 26, pollution 24
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Type: Writing - Document
Published: 1 week, 4 days ago
Rating: General

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