Welcome to Inkbunny...
Allowed ratings
To view member-only content, create an account. ( Hide )
The Reignhearts, An Excerpt
« older newer »
Kindar
Kindar's Gallery (612)

The Founding of Tiranis, Part 1 (an Excerpt)

The Founding of Tiranis, Part 2 (an Excerpt)
tiranis_excerpt.txt
Keywords human 81358, lynx 10988, drama 3613, no sex 976, history 454, other / not specified 384, super power 9
The Founding of Tiranis, Part 1 (an Excerpt)
A story of the past


      She didn't stop running as he called to him. "Please, sir! We need your help!"

      He set his face into a stern mask and readied himself to tell her to go back to her wagon an move on. She couldn't say anything that would make him agree to helping them. He even had his mouth open, but then he saw what her bundle was. She was holding a baby.

      Ah hell, he thought, they just had to bring a babe. And not just one. Small heads poked over the cart's sides to look at him, large eyes filled with sadness. They had kids too.

      The lynx sighed. He couldn't turn away a baby or kids. He'd taken on an entire walled city, back during his youth, because the self proclaimed king there was hording the food and leaving the children to die hungry. Then he'd gone and killed the tyrants of Umberhill because he was sacrificing babies to the gods who gave him his powers.

      Ellarkay had never been able to leave a babe to suffer.

      He looked at his rifle for a moment, then lowered it. There went his peace. There went his promise not to hurt anyone. Maybe he could deal with this problem and send them on their way, keep other troubles from landing at his feet.

      The woman looked at him, but he watched the distance behind her. The wind had brought him the sound of more hooves on hard dirt. He could just make out another cloud of dust on the horizon.

      "You being chased?" His voice was like dry sand, raw from disuse.

      She half turned to look at the approaching cloud and clutched her baby to her breast.

      "Get the wagons and cart to the side of my shack. Unhook the horses and tie them down behind. After that turn the carts on their side for coverage. Put anyone who has guns behind them, the rest go behind the house. The shooters are to shoot only on my command.

      They quickly moved the wagons and made a wall of them, even the children helped, and the lynx almost smiled, only remembering at the last moment he didn't want them here. Ellarkay saw flesh, fur, feathers and scales among the group. It had been a long time since he'd seen such a diverse group.

      Of the entire group, only two had weapons. One of the humans had an old revolver, and a bird with colorful feathers and hooked beak had a rifle. Neither looked comfortable holding them. Ellarkay almost took the weapons out of their hands. These two would only hurt themselves if they tried to fire them. But they needed the moral support holding guns gave them. He'd just have to make sure to handle their pursuers himself.

      He cradled his bulletless rifle back in his arm and took position in front of his shack again.

      This time it was only riders on horse back, twelve of them. Seven Furkind and five humans. The leader was Furkind, a rat with a scarred face and angry eyes. The human riding at his flank had a contraption on his right forearm.

      Ellarkay gritted his teeth. He didn't know what that one was, but he'd seen devices like it before. Things, created before the dark times, that should have remained lost.

      Nothing from back then was good news.

      The horses came to a stop. The rat looked at the lynx, then at the overturned wagons.

      "Well howdy there, old man," he greeted in a cheerful tone.

      Ellarkay eyed him. "You're going to want to keep on moving." The lynx's tone was somber.

      The rat leaned forward in his saddle. "'Fraid I can't do that. See, those there, they belong to my boss. And I've got orders to bring them back. Been chasing them for over a week now, so I'm not going back without them."

      Ellarkay considered it. A week, maybe a little more. Yeah, if he remembered his distances, and they'd pushed the horses as hard as they could take, they'd come from the middle of the cotton lands. Was one of them Special? That would explain the kind of luck needed to avoid all the land barons and their enforcers between there and here. Not to say how they hadn't killed their horses.

      The lynx sighed. "That's going to be a problem. They went and asked for my protection." He glanced over his shoulder. "Normally I'd have sent them off for you to chase, but they had babes and kids." He gave the rat a sad smile. "I just can't stomach the thought of young ones coming to harm. So I'm going to tell you again, move on."

      Distant thunder sounded, and some of the men looked up. Clouds were gathering, but none of them looked threatening.

      "Look around, old man. There's twelve of us and only one of you. I'm not counting the two cowering over there. The way their iron's shaking, they'll never hit anything. You can't stop us from taking them back."

      The lynx shrugged. "Don't change anything. They're on my land and I gave them my protection, so I'm going to have to stop you."

      "You daft old timer? Living alone's been making you want company so bad you willing to die for it?"

      Ellarkay snorted. "This ain't about me wanting company. Once I'm down with you I'm sending them on their way. I'm not fit to be company."

      They rat raised his hands in exasperation. "Then just give them to us. You'll be alone in no time."

      "Can't be doing that. Said I'd protect them. Gave my word. That's sacred to me."

      Thunder came again, and clouds covered part of the sun. Some of the horses whinnied and skittered around until their riders brought them back under control.

      Ellarkay looked up, the sky still didn't look like anything more than a partially cloudy one. "Gonna tell you one last time. Move on. Be on your way. I don't want to be responsible for what's coming."

      "The only thing coming is your death," the rat snapped. "Leroy!"

      The human raised his arm and the device attached to it began to spin, sparks jumping off it, as it moved. Ellarkay felt the lightning gather inside it, and he was surprised for a moment. He'd forgotten that lightning could form elsewhere than the sky. The bolt of lightning jumped from the device to the lynx's chest.

      Ellarkay flew back, his rifle clattering to the ground. He hit the closed door to his shack, then slid down against it, his chest smoking.

      "You poor old fool," the rat sighed. "You didn't have to die."
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
page
1
page
2
page
3
page
4
page
5
page
6
page
7
page
8
page
9
page
10
page
11
page
12
page
13
page
14
page
15
page
16
page
17
page
18
page
19
page
20
page
21
page
22
page
23
page
24
page
25
page
26
page
27
page
28
page
29
page
30
page
31
page
32
page
33
page
34
page
35
page
36
page
37
page
38
page
39
page
40
page
41
page
42
page
43
page
44
page
45
page
46
page
47
page
48
page
49
page
50
page
51
page
52
page
53
page
54
page
55
page
56
page
57
page
58
page
59
page
60
page
61
page
62
page
63
page
64
page
65
page
66
page
67
page
68
page
69
page
70
page
71
page
72
page
73
page
74
page
75
page
76
page
77
page
78
page
79
page
80
page
81
page
82
page
83
page
84
page
85
page
86
page
87
page
88
page
89
page
90
page
91
page
92
page
93
page
94
page
95
page
96
page
97
page
98
page
99
page
100
page
101
page
102
page
103
page
104
page
105
page
106
page
107
page
108
page
109
page
110
page
111
page
112
page
113
page
114
page
115
page
116
page
117
page
118
page
119
page
120
page
121
page
122
page
123
page
124
page
125
page
126
page
127
page
128
page
129
page
130
page
131
page
132
page
133
page
134
page
135
page
136
page
137
page
138
page
139
page
140
page
141
page
142
page
143
page
144
page
145
page
146
page
147
page
148
page
149
page
150
page
151
page
152
page
153
page
154
page
155
page
156
page
157
page
158
page
159
page
160
page
161
page
162
page
163
page
164
page
165
page
166
page
167
page
168
page
169
page
170
page
171
page
172
page
173
page
174
page
175
page
176
page
177
page
178
page
179
page
180
page
181
page
182
page
183
page
184
page
185
page
186
page
187
page
188
page
189
page
190
page
191
page
192
page
193
page
194
page
195
page
196
page
197
page
198
page
199
page
200
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
 
 
page
1
page
2
page
3
page
4
page
5
page
6
page
7
page
8
page
9
page
10
page
11
page
12
page
13
page
14
page
15
page
16
page
17
page
18
page
19
page
20
page
21
page
22
page
23
page
24
page
25
page
26
page
27
page
28
page
29
page
30
page
31
page
32
page
33
page
34
page
35
page
36
page
37
page
38
page
39
page
40
page
41
page
42
page
43
page
44
page
45
page
46
page
47
page
48
page
49
page
50
page
51
page
52
page
53
page
54
page
55
page
56
page
57
page
58
page
59
page
60
page
61
page
62
page
63
page
64
page
65
page
66
page
67
page
68
page
69
page
70
page
71
page
72
page
73
page
74
page
75
page
76
page
77
page
78
page
79
page
80
page
81
page
82
page
83
page
84
page
85
page
86
page
87
page
88
page
89
page
90
page
91
page
92
page
93
page
94
page
95
page
96
page
97
page
98
page
99
page
100
page
101
page
102
page
103
page
104
page
105
page
106
page
107
page
108
page
109
page
110
page
111
page
112
page
113
page
114
page
115
page
116
page
117
page
118
page
119
page
120
page
121
page
122
page
123
page
124
page
125
page
126
page
127
page
128
page
129
page
130
page
131
page
132
page
133
page
134
page
135
page
136
page
137
page
138
page
139
page
140
page
141
page
142
page
143
page
144
page
145
page
146
page
147
page
148
page
149
page
150
page
151
page
152
page
153
page
154
page
155
page
156
page
157
page
158
page
159
page
160
page
161
page
162
page
163
page
164
page
165
page
166
page
167
page
168
page
169
page
170
page
171
page
172
page
173
page
174
page
175
page
176
page
177
page
178
page
179
page
180
page
181
page
182
page
183
page
184
page
185
page
186
page
187
page
188
page
189
page
190
page
191
page
192
page
193
page
194
page
195
page
196
page
197
page
198
page
199
page
200
by Kindar
The Reignhearts, An Excerpt
The Founding of Tiranis, Part 2 (an Excerpt)
Tiranis is a world of humans and furries, of super science and super powers, of ordinary people and extraordinary ones.  

Stories of the Past is a series of stories exploring the history of the city of Tiranis, as well as the world it exist in or something people of importance in it.

This is excerpt is about 1000 word of a 5,600 word chapter.

You can read the full story, as well as other stories set in the world of Tiranis by joining my Patreon at the 1$ level: https://www.patreon.com/kindar

Keywords
human 81,358, lynx 10,988, drama 3,613, no sex 976, history 454, other / not specified 384, super power 9
Details
Type: Writing - Document
Published: 4 years, 11 months ago
Rating: General

MD5 Hash for Page 1... Show Find Identical Posts [?]
Stats
28 views
0 favorites
0 comments

BBCode Tags Show [?]
 
New Comment:
Move reply box to top
Log in or create an account to comment.