Welcome to Inkbunny...
Allowed ratings
To view member-only content, create an account. ( Hide )
How Deidrei Saved Easter
« older newer »
CyberCornEntropic
CyberCornEntropic's Gallery (403)

The Winterfur Calendar

Moon Rabbit - Part 5
winterfur_calendar.rtf
Keywords day 1976, year 483, calendar 275, month 94, week 65, winterfur 34, worldbuilding 28, baksrit 15, deidrei 5
World of Winterfur
The Calendar

Days of the Week:


      Days in the Midlands region of the Winterfur world last 24 hours long, each hour consisting of 60 minutes of 60 seconds each.  Seven days make up a week.  As in our world, the days are related to the Sun, Moon, or one of the five visible planets.  In converting the day names to English, the names of roughly equivalent real world gods and goddesses have been used as a baseline, as detailed below.

Days               Real World Equivalent             Real Life God/Goddess
—————————————————————————————
Sämasday
             Sunday                         Shamash        (Akkadian)   sun
Chaníday              Monday                       Chang'e          (Chinese)      moon
Päwetday             Tuesday                       Wepwawet     (Egyptian)     war
Ganday                Wednesday                  Ganesha          (Hindu)        wisdom
Ükisday                Thursday                      Ukko              (Finnish)       thunder
Astéday                Friday                          Astarte           (Semitic)       love
Rongéday             Saturday                       Rongo             (Maori)        harvest

Notes on the gods and goddesses:
Shamash
– Sun god of the Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian pantheons and also the god of justice for Assyria and Babylonia.
Chang'e – Moon goddess of China.  Accompanied by a rabbit mixing the elixir of immortality.  An analogue exists in the Winterfur world.
Wepwawet – A war god of Egypt.  Originally portrayed as a wolf or a wolf-headed human, but later sometimes mistaken for a jackal with a white color.  Corresponds to the Norse Tyr for Tuesday.
Ganesha – Deva of intellect and wisdom of the Hindu pantheon.  Appears as an elephant with four arms and is considered the "Opener of Ways".  Corresponds to the Norse Oden for Wednesday.
Ukko – Weather god of Finnish and Estonian myth and the equivalent of the Greek Zeus or the Norse Thor with hints of Oden.  His lightning symbol resembles a snake with a saw-tooth pattern on its back.  Corresponds to Thor for Thursday.
Astarte – Fertility and love goddess from the Eastern Mediterranean who later developed into many well-known goddesses including the Babylonian Ishtar and the Greek Aphrodite among others.  Has long been associated with Friday and the planet Venus.  Corresponds to the Norse Frigg for Friday.
Rongo – God of cultivated food for the Māori and brother to the god of uncultivated food.  Corresponds to the Roman Saturn for Saturday.

Notes:
      As can be expected from being the equivalent of our Sunday, Sämasday is a day of worship and rest for most people in the Midlands, although there are groups who prefer Astéday or Rongéday instead, just as some real world groups use Friday or Saturday.
      As noted above, an equivalent to Chang'e exists in the Winterfur world, as seen in Moon Rabbit.  There, she is the rabbit instead of merely accompanying one.  She is often described as wearing jade-colored robes and her fur of multiple shades of gray gently glows with a faint, pale light.  Of the other gods and goddesses mentioned above, nothing is known yet.


Months of the Year:

      The Winterfur world has one moon similar in size and appearance to our own with a sidereal period of approximately 28-29 days.  This gives one 365-day calendar year 12 months.  Lunar calendars typically insert a 13th month every few years in order to keep the months properly aligned with the year.
      The Imperial calendar created during the Empire of the Great Phoenix, Pax, is a solar calendar with dates fixed to the solstices and equinoxes.  Because of Pax's longevity (she regenerated every 500 years and had already lived for several thousand years at her assassination), she had already noted several discrepancies calendars developed over time and had corrections built into the Imperial calendar, including the timing of when leap days should be included or not included in the calendar.  The months are as follows.  (Please note that the names of months have yet to be established.  When they are, this document will be updated as appropriate.)

Months               Real World Equivalent       Number        Meaning
                               (Approximate)                   of Days
———————————————————————————–––––
                                January                          30              snow
                                February                        30              rain
                                March                            31              wind
                                April                              30              germination
                                May                              30               flowering
                                June                              31               pasture
                                July                               31               harvest
                                August                          30                heat
                                September                    31                fruit
                                October                        30               vintage
                                November                     30               fog
                                December                      31               frost
                                Leap Day                       1                "bissextus"

Notes:
      Although the names of the months are as yet undetermined, their meanings are the same as those of the French Revolutionary calendar as named by poet Fabre d'Eglantine.  The exact timing of Leap Day has yet to be determined, possibly occurring every three to four years.  "Bisexxtus" is the Latin name for Leap Day, as it was essentially a doubling of the sixth day  before the first of March (February 24; the six days included both February 24 and March 1).  The name of the Winterfur world's Leap Day is undetermined and might simply be "Leap Day".
      Winterfur months do not directly correspond their Gregorian equivalents.  Rather, they start a week and a half earlier so that the last day of the 31-day third, sixth, ninth, and twelfth months fall on or near one of the equinoxes or solstices.  Originally, these were intercalary days and not part of any month or week.  However, over time, they were incorporated into the previous months although they were considered holidays and extra days of the weekend.

Sprínday                           Spring Equinox
Sumsday                           Summer Solstice
Ätumésday                        Autumnal Equinox
Wintäsday                        Winter Solstice


On the Numbering of Years:

      Years are traditionally reckoned from the founding of Pax's empire.  These are off from real world Western reckoning by roughly 600 to 700 years, although technological and cultural development does not match ours exactly.  Relevant dates are as follows.  All dates are RMP (Regnum Magnae Phoenigis – Reign of the Great Phoenix) and will be updated as appropriate.

2130 – Jaiken (weasel) born to Antenius of Albes (weasel), second of two sons to his first wife who dies not long after.

2132 – Antenius marries Jasmine (weasel) three months into her pregnancy of their first child.
            Baksrit (weasel) born in mid-autumn to Antenius and Jasmine, first of three daughters.

2133 – Deidrei (squirrel) born in mid- to late spring to Diana Bekka Leafbright (squirrel) of the Treetop Artemins.

2142 – Baksrit apprenticed to the wizard Solomon (human).

2143 – A spell backfires, severely injuring Baksrit at the very end of the year.  She enters a depression and nearly starves to death.

2144 – In mid-spring, five months after her accident, Baksrit begins regaining her spellcasting abilities in an encounter with a kappa, and returns to Solomon the following month.  It takes over a year for her to completely recover.

2149 – The events of How Deidrei Saved Easter (mid-spring) and Moon Rabbit (early summer) occur.

2151 – Baksrit becomes a journeyman wizard.  A month later, she meets Deidrei who is still grieving over the death of her friend and lover, Lori (ring-tailed lemur).  They become friends (but not lovers), leading to Deidrei leaving the village with Baksrit to gain experience with the outside world.

2152 – The events of Coyote Folksongs and The Woodcarver's Geis occur in mid-spring as part of a larger adventure.
            The events of Do Unto Me occur in summer as a result of Baksrit and Deidrei's adventure.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
page
1
page
2
page
3
page
4
page
5
page
6
page
7
page
8
page
9
page
10
page
11
page
12
page
13
page
14
page
15
page
16
page
17
page
18
page
19
page
20
page
21
page
22
page
23
page
24
page
25
page
26
page
27
page
28
page
29
page
30
page
31
page
32
page
33
page
34
page
35
page
36
page
37
page
38
page
39
page
40
page
41
page
42
page
43
page
44
page
45
page
46
page
47
page
48
page
49
page
50
page
51
page
52
page
53
page
54
page
55
page
56
page
57
page
58
page
59
page
60
page
61
page
62
page
63
page
64
page
65
page
66
page
67
page
68
page
69
page
70
page
71
page
72
page
73
page
74
page
75
page
76
page
77
page
78
page
79
page
80
page
81
page
82
page
83
page
84
page
85
page
86
page
87
page
88
page
89
page
90
page
91
page
92
page
93
page
94
page
95
page
96
page
97
page
98
page
99
page
100
page
101
page
102
page
103
page
104
page
105
page
106
page
107
page
108
page
109
page
110
page
111
page
112
page
113
page
114
page
115
page
116
page
117
page
118
page
119
page
120
page
121
page
122
page
123
page
124
page
125
page
126
page
127
page
128
page
129
page
130
page
131
page
132
page
133
page
134
page
135
page
136
page
137
page
138
page
139
page
140
page
141
page
142
page
143
page
144
page
145
page
146
page
147
page
148
page
149
page
150
page
151
page
152
page
153
page
154
page
155
page
156
page
157
page
158
page
159
page
160
page
161
page
162
page
163
page
164
page
165
page
166
page
167
page
168
page
169
page
170
page
171
page
172
page
173
page
174
page
175
page
176
page
177
page
178
page
179
page
180
page
181
page
182
page
183
page
184
page
185
page
186
page
187
page
188
page
189
page
190
page
191
page
192
page
193
page
194
page
195
page
196
page
197
page
198
page
199
page
200
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
 
 
page
1
page
2
page
3
page
4
page
5
page
6
page
7
page
8
page
9
page
10
page
11
page
12
page
13
page
14
page
15
page
16
page
17
page
18
page
19
page
20
page
21
page
22
page
23
page
24
page
25
page
26
page
27
page
28
page
29
page
30
page
31
page
32
page
33
page
34
page
35
page
36
page
37
page
38
page
39
page
40
page
41
page
42
page
43
page
44
page
45
page
46
page
47
page
48
page
49
page
50
page
51
page
52
page
53
page
54
page
55
page
56
page
57
page
58
page
59
page
60
page
61
page
62
page
63
page
64
page
65
page
66
page
67
page
68
page
69
page
70
page
71
page
72
page
73
page
74
page
75
page
76
page
77
page
78
page
79
page
80
page
81
page
82
page
83
page
84
page
85
page
86
page
87
page
88
page
89
page
90
page
91
page
92
page
93
page
94
page
95
page
96
page
97
page
98
page
99
page
100
page
101
page
102
page
103
page
104
page
105
page
106
page
107
page
108
page
109
page
110
page
111
page
112
page
113
page
114
page
115
page
116
page
117
page
118
page
119
page
120
page
121
page
122
page
123
page
124
page
125
page
126
page
127
page
128
page
129
page
130
page
131
page
132
page
133
page
134
page
135
page
136
page
137
page
138
page
139
page
140
page
141
page
142
page
143
page
144
page
145
page
146
page
147
page
148
page
149
page
150
page
151
page
152
page
153
page
154
page
155
page
156
page
157
page
158
page
159
page
160
page
161
page
162
page
163
page
164
page
165
page
166
page
167
page
168
page
169
page
170
page
171
page
172
page
173
page
174
page
175
page
176
page
177
page
178
page
179
page
180
page
181
page
182
page
183
page
184
page
185
page
186
page
187
page
188
page
189
page
190
page
191
page
192
page
193
page
194
page
195
page
196
page
197
page
198
page
199
page
200
Character Meme (BEWARE THE SQUIRREL! FEAR HER!!!)
Moon Rabbit - Part 1
In the course of writing Moon Rabbit, I found myself needing to consult my notes on the Winterfur world calendar in order to keep my timing right.  As I've already mentioned the names of two days of the week (Sämasday and Chaníday), I wrote up this guide to put everything in one place.  It's not complete (most obviously I haven't filled in the names of the months yet) and shouldn't be considered set in stone, but it'll work for now.  I will update it as necessary in the future.

The entry above describes the Imperial calendar, the equivalent to our Gregorian calendar.  Years can be thought of as being reckoned as if 1 AD was the founding of Rome (753 BC).  Naturally, there are other calendars and naming schemes that exist in the Winterfur world, but this is the one most likely to be encountered in the kingdom of Gloomhaven.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask them below.

Worldbuilding entry © 2011 Marvin E. Fuller

Keywords
day 1,976, year 483, calendar 275, month 94, week 65, winterfur 34, worldbuilding 28, baksrit 15, deidrei 5
Details
Type: Writing - Document
Published: 7 years, 6 months ago
Rating: General

MD5 Hash for Page 1... Show Find Identical Posts [?]
Stats
49 views
0 favorites
0 comments

BBCode Tags Show [?]
 
New Comment:
Move reply box to top
Log in or create an account to comment.