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GalaxyViolet

Wonder on ya thoughts on a dynamic

If someone commissions/requests an OC and is heavy on getting the EXACT design of the character done on a one to one ratio, how do you artists react if its a request or a paid commission

Even so how do you feel on artistic freedom?
Viewed: 25 times
Added: 2 months, 2 weeks ago
 
Eviscerator
2 months, 2 weeks ago
Request, you take your chances.

With paid commissions, the customer gets what they pay for, within the limits of the TOS, this is why people put in limits on edits and requirements for references.

Artistic freedom isn't for commissions as much as it is for wing-its.
GalaxyViolet
2 months, 2 weeks ago
I can see that wholeheartedly, hmm I wonder how do popular artist deal with that because sometimes even when stating a sample sketch and they get the OK they too sometimes get hit with the ''change this here please' or 'can you follow the ref listed' which is fine but I still wonder because some artists get angry or hostile at the gesture even if it is a paid commission.
Shadowwalk
2 months, 2 weeks ago
That's a bit of a rough point, I'd say.  When it comes down to it, the 'customer gets what they want' usually applies with paid commissions, yes.  However it is VERY helpful when the customer states pretty much every certain detail they want before getting too far into it.  I admit, I've had a few times where certain last minute changes were requested during the later stages.  And while I may have found it slightly annoying at first, I still make sure the customer gets their money's worth in the end.

This also proves that I like it when a paid artist goes out of their way to show the stages of their progress, so to keep the option of changes/alterations open when they matter the most.
GalaxyViolet
2 months, 2 weeks ago
sounds right to me, I usually follow the same practice so that way the customer feels at ease
SexMajin
2 months, 2 weeks ago
Yeah this, pretty much.
specterHSC
2 months, 2 weeks ago
Honestly, I feel like if someone commission someone and they demanded it be exactly like the original design, I would feel like that is stepping a line.

Like, if you commission someone, you should research what their style is like and how close to what you want it to be is. If they can get pretty close to the original design, sure ask if they can do it like that. But if their style is nothing like the original design and that is dead set what you want, why are you commission some one that doesn't do that style?
GalaxyViolet
2 months, 2 weeks ago
True that, unno why people do that, but there are a few that i seen that has honestly but it is hard to put a loyalty code on "it is what they paid for" VS keeping a style
EmpireOfTheEgg
2 months, 2 weeks ago
It's a tricky one to answer, and it depends on the circumstances. With both requests and commissions, I always ask for a full picture reference just to make sure I get every detail right. However, if their ref is incomplete, they can either give me a description or allow for some artistic freedom.

Style is a weird one too - there is no way you can 100% adhere to a particular style, you always have your own style and nuances when it comes to art.
fibs
2 months, 2 weeks ago
The client should make this clear before any payment is made and before work begins, and then the artist simply chooses whether to accept those terms or decline the commission. Whatever injury to their finances or reputation occurs is the artist's decision.

The payment serves as the handshake that seals the contract. You don't change the terms after the agreement is made.
emikochan
2 months, 2 weeks ago
Personally I try to go for accuracy as much as possible, but changing things that were given the OK is very annoying. I'm very happy to make fixes to the sketch until it's right, but late changes are a pain.

Commissions aren't really about freedom either way. Is why so many artists stop doing them once they get big enough.
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