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CyberCornEntropic

Mary Had A Little Lamb... On Venus

Earth isn't the only solar system world with an atmosphere.  Not counting the giant planets which are virtually all atmosphere (although squished into liquid and solid forms deep inside the planets), there's Venus with its heavy atmosphere 93 times Earth's at sea level, Mars's much less flattening air at .59 atmospheres, Titan at 1.45 atmospheres, and Triton at a puny .000019 to .00004 atmospheres.  Every other known solar system planetary atmosphere is so thin as to be nearly inconsequential in comparison, with the exception of Pluto's which only appears when it's closest to the Sun and freezes out farther out.

Of course, if we're going to be talking about air, some people might wonder what they might sound like on other worlds.  While no space probes equipped with microphones have been sent out to snoop on alien winds, it is possible to model how the different air pressures would affect a person's voice.  Tim Leighton of the University of Southampton in England has done so and provided Science News samples of his voice as it might sound on Venus and Titan.  As an example, a speaker's vocal cords would vibrate slower in the Venerean atmosphere due to the denser atmosphere, but his voice would travel faster, making him seem smaller.  Thus, someone on Venus would sound like a bass Smurf.

In my opinion, the changes aren't as dramatic as helium's chipmunk voices, falling more or less in the normal range of human voice patterns on Earth, but you'd want to compare it with the same voice on Earth to get an idea of what those changes are anyway.  Perhaps some intrepid person skilled in manipulating sounds electronically can find a way to easily replicate these effects for anyone who can provide a voice sample.

http://www.sciencenews.org/view/feature/id/340449/titl...
Viewed: 9 times
Added: 6 years, 6 months ago
 
dmfalk
6 years, 6 months ago
Don't need digital manipulation, just sulfur hexafluoride. :)

d.m.f.
CyberCornEntropic
6 years, 6 months ago
On the other hand, the digital manipulation would be a lot easier on your skin. :o
dmfalk
6 years, 6 months ago
Actually, despite being based on sulfur and fluorine- both corrosive elements- it's incredibly inert, and it's only hazard deals with the need for ventilation-- Because of its density, it pushes air up and out of the lungs. (Basically, the sane effect helium has on the respiratory system, except helium easily escapes on its own, because it's lighter than air.) Because SF6 is heavier/denser, it'll cause vocal chords to pitch down, but one would need to breath several deep breaths of air to push it out, or risk asphyxiation. For effect, because of its density, SF6 can sit in a tub(!) and safely buoy light objects, just like water, even be scooped up and poured like a liquid, even though it is a gas.

Venus' atmosphere, interestingly, is much denser than water, but still gaseous-- If one could survive being crushed and deep-fried at the same time, one's vocal density would barely sound like a very low rumble. For a deep voice, I'd suggest sticking with xenon (5x denser than air) or SF6 (6x denser than air). :) Less chance getting fried! :D

Plenty of demonstration videos of the use of SF6 as a vocal effect on YouTube. ;)

d.m.f.
CyberCornEntropic
6 years, 6 months ago
Hunh.  The more you know, it seems.  Good to know.  Thanks. :)
dmfalk
6 years, 6 months ago
*dons white lab coat, strikes dramatic pose* It's SCIENCE! :D

;)

d.m.f.
CyberCornEntropic
6 years, 6 months ago
More than that, it's Science News? :p
dmfalk
6 years, 6 months ago
Enquiring minds wanna know? :)

d.m.f.
CyberCornEntropic
6 years, 6 months ago
Not to mention less chance of getting frozen solid, too.
dmfalk
6 years, 6 months ago
...Or exploding into flames from the methane atmosphere, combined with exhaled oxygen and body heat... O.o

On a slightly unrelated note, I find it a bit amusing that were a spacecraft to orbit Titan at the same altitude as the ISS does here at Earth, it would be well inside Titan's atmosphere, even under the cloud layer... o.O

d.m.f.
CyberCornEntropic
6 years, 6 months ago
True.  Any hypothetical lifeforms on Titan must think we're science fiction at best, pure fantasy at worst.  After all, we're operating at temperatures that are insanely hot to them, as Earth would seem almost Venus-like in temperatures to them.  And their thoughts towards Venus must be hellish. :o

The ISS orbital height thing does make sense.  As Titan has less mass than Earth does, it would have a lower gravity and thus can't hold onto its air as tightly as Earth does.  Titan's atmosphere would be "fluffier" and reach out farther from the surface.
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