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MicahWeil
MicahWeil's Scraps (1)

Shameful FanFic Theater - Trinkets for Rarity

trinkets.doc
Keywords pony 67853, my little pony 40961, my little pony friendship is magic 16965, friendship is magic 7050, what was i thinking 1
Trinkets for Rarity

A “My Muse is a Psychotic Bitch” Fanfic, regretfully, by Micah Weil

It wasn't uncommon to see carts of garbage going towards the outskirts of Ponyville. It was better than letting everything pile up, and the only junk yard was well outside of town, away from everything. Every couple of days or so, the residents of the town would load up their carts and take it down to Trinket's.

Trinket, of course, was the name of the unicorn that ran the place, and by himself at that. The stallion ran a tight ship, with the rest of Ponyville bringing their garbage in during the day, every day, so it could be sorted and disposed of properly. He took pride in his job, and relished the praise that the rest of Ponyville gave him for handling the "necessary ickiness".

Sweet Apple Acres had dropped off their garbage not too long ago that day. Acres usually made it easy for him; the vast majority of their trash was apple cores and wooden remains from farm equipment and fences. It was easy to sort, if not for the sheer volume that came off of a farm with that many ponies working on it. He was on his third batch of cores, which he was throwing into a compost heap, when he heard another cart approaching the front gate to his yard. "Just a moment," he called out, his voice expressing a bit of culture that one wouldn't expect coming from a trash heap. He let his magic fade, dropping the apples into the compost pile, before he headed to the gate. "Lemme get that for you." He bowed his head forward. From the brown horn atop his head, a glowing magic undid the latch and slid the gate open. "C'mon in."

"Thank you, Trinket." The peppy, hoighty voice was not one he heard very often, but he recognized it none the less. The white coated unicorn walked in carefully, not wanting to step on or in any of the trash that littered the grounds. Her gaze fell upon the unicorn proprieter. His brown coat was dirty, as usual, as she expected. She wrinkled her nose at the sight. "I see you've been busy."

"Hello Rarity," he said, ignoring the distain in her voice. "I wasn't expecting you to come here. Doesn't your father usually deliver your family's trash?"

"Yes," she said. "Unfortunately, he had some errands to run, so...here I am." She pulled the cart in behind her, coming to rest so he could help her unload. "I don't mean to trouble you, of course..."

"No trouble at all." He stepped up beside her and helped her get the harness off of her back. "What did you bring me today?"

"Oh, you know, the usual. Food scraps, some remains from my work, that sort of thing."

"Cloth scraps?" The stallion's attention was peaked. He stared over the side of the cart, his horn lighting up and started to automatically seperate the garbage into bins he'd set up by the entrance. He looked at everything, until he found what he was looking for. The pieces of cloth, various colors, shapes, and sizes, floated up into the air for his inspection. "Yes, this is exactly what I need. Thank you, Miss Rarity." They floated onto his back as he started into the yard.

"Thank me?" She seemed rather confused. "Why are you thanking me for garbage cloth that I'm not going to use?"

"Well, just because you're not using it, doesn't mean it's garbage." He turned to her with a smile. "Would you like to see?"

She nodded and cantered to join him. "I have always been curious about what it is you do here. I mean, you ARE a garbage pony, but your cutie mark..." She looked at the mark he bore, a fine silver chain with a pendant made of an old tin can. "It just makes no sense."

"Just come with me. I have a lot to show you."

He took her on a tour of the entire yard, showing her every last nook and cranny. She was introduced to the compost heap, where he turned all of Ponyville's discarded food and weeds into mulch to sell to the farms. She saw where he separated the wood and metal scraps for collection by other yards to be recycled into paper, tools, and other such products. She was quick to pass by the trash heap, where everything else went.

The tour stopped at one building far from the gate. It wasn't like everything else that she'd seen; it was clean and well kept, a true oddity amongst the trash. "What is this place?" she asked curiously.

"Have you ever heard of the phrase 'diamond in the rough'? Well, this is my version of it. It's my workshop." He nudged the latch off of the door and eased it open with his nose. "Come inside."

Rarity sauntered in, looking about the deceptively large room. To one side, she saw what looked like a statue, made out of scraps of metal. Each slab, each sliver had been painstakenly formed to create the rough shape of a set of legs and an underbelly. The top half still bore jagged edges of a project incomplete. Straight ahead, she saw a window. It looked like the windows she'd seen numerous times at Princess Celestia's palace, save that it was devoid of color, and made of multiple shards of glass.

Finally, her attention turned to where Trinket had headed off to. She saw the wooden hull of a small ship, far smaller than what he would need to sail. His horn glowed as his innate magics took over. The scraps of cloth fluttered up to the mast, and started to piece themselves together. Configuration after configuration would be assembled before she saw what he was making. It was colorful, but she quickly recognized the Jolly Roger. "You're making a pirate ship?" she chirped, astonished at what she saw.

"Only a play one," he responded. A needle threaded itself and quickly stitched the sail together. "Miss Cheerilee wanted something for the colts and fillies to play on at the school."

"So you built them a pirate ship?"

"Right. They said 'we want a pirate ship'. I've been working on it all month. Now that I have a sail, all I need to do is dye it and slap a coat of paint on the hull. They'll have their pirate ship."

"Well, I must say!" She trotted up to inspect it. "I never knew you did this. It's quite a talent."

"Thank you kindly." He smiled and straightened himself out. His chest puffed out, swolen with pride.

Rarity smiled and looked over the hull. It all seemed familiar. "Where'd you get the wood for this, though?" Trinket opened his mouth to speak. Her eyes were faster, though, as she spotted pieces she knew she recognized. "Is...that part of a barn door?"

"Yes it is," he said, stepping up alongside her. "Sweet Apple Acres turned that one in after a bit of a bull scare broke it down."

"And this here," she said, pointing to a sign and ignoring his explaination. "This is the old sign from the spa!"

"That's right."

"And the sail...is made from things I am just throwing away." She looked at him. "All of this..."

"Is recycled," he said. He smiled again, still very proud of himself.

"Is garbage!" She went over to the window. "This...this is made of broken glass! It's dangerous!"

"Right now it is. I still have to stain the glass and set it all into the frame."

Again, she ignored him and went to the statue. "And this is made of rusty metal. Who would want that?"

His smile finally faded. "It's not rusty, if you really look. I wouldn't dare use rusty metal."

"And this...this pirate ship!" She stampeded over to it. "You expect children to play on this! Rotted, splintered wood with a ratty, dirty old sail?"

He paused for a second, then smiled. "So, you're saying you only work with dirty cloth?"

She stammered. "Why I never-!"

"That is still the cloth you brought me to throw away." She frowned and tossed her well groomed mane back indignantly. "Look, Rarity, I would never do anything to hurt anyone. Especially the kids. Each piece I used in each of these things I hoof picked, making sure there is nothing dangerous to it. With the pirate ship, I sanded each piece smooth. There is no rot, no splinters." He sauntered over, leaning forward with his bigger frame. "I don't produce shoddy workmanship."

"You work with garbage," she snorted, moving for the exit.

"Yeah. I do. I get rid of the stuff that can't be reused, and when someone asks me to, I make things out of the good stuff." He cantered over and nudged her out of his workshop. "But I understand."

Rarity looked at him incredulously. "You...do?"

"Oh yeah." The door shut itself and locked. "You work with beauty all the time. You thrive on elegance, right?" She nodded as they walked towards the yard gate. "Well, that's your thing. Now, I need to lock up a few things before heading into town. Thanks for stopping by, though."

"Oh...well..."

"And tell your father I said hi if you see him." He smiled warmly. "Don't be a stranger." He disappeared back into the yard once more.

Rarity was stunned. Had she just been...kicked out?

"I don't understand." She was meeting with Twilight and Spike for lunch. Their orders had been placed, and they chatted as they waited for the food to come out. "All I did was point out that he was using garbage to build something that kids were going to play on, and that it was dangerous."

"You were only concerned," Twilight assured her. "His pride's just bruised."

"I know." She sighed. "I just feel bad."

"Because you got kicked out?" Spike asked.

She frowned. "He's not the only one with pride to be bruised."

"Well, I wouldn't worry about it too much," Twilight reassured her. "You have more important things to take care of, right?"

"Huh? Oh, yes." She sat up as her salad was set before her. "My dresses for the show tonight."

"How are those coming along, anyway?"

"They look simply marvelous!" She smiled as she sat up tall and proud. "And I have the perfect necklaces to go with them, too." Her horn glowed, producing images of what the pieces of jewelery looked like. "Each dress designed around them to create a positively beautiful look."

"Those look good," Spike said, a tiny bit of drool appearing at the corner of his mouth. His stomach growled wantingly.

"I can't wait to see them," Twilight added, looking down at her salad.

"As soon as lunch is done, I am heading back home to add the final touches." She leaned in and began eating. "You will be coming to the show tonight?"

"Of course. I wouldn't miss it for the world!" She smiled and started into her lunch.

The day was beautiful as it was. Rarity saw no reason to keep her windows shut. They were all thrown open, letting the fresh air flow as she put the final touches on the last dress she was working on. It was a soft little thing, playfully green and just as frilly as the other dresses. The finished ones sat on manequins, necklaces eargerly hanging off of the wooden necks. The sun danced off of them, glistening in their brilliance.

It was a brilliance that didn't go unnoticed. As Rarity started up her sewing machine, and put needle to fabric, she failed to notice a magpie land on her window's sill. It tilted its head to one side, its attention firmly on the glistening jewels. It quickly flew off, letting off a cry that Rarity ignored. The sill was vacant for but a few moments, before the magpie returned. Then another appeared by its side. And then another. It took only a few seconds for the sill to be overstuffed with birds, all eying the jewels.

Rarity was too preoccupied with the dress to notice. Two by two, the birds flew into the shop and, together, grabbed the necklaces and fled, their treasure's well in wing.

"There. All finished." It was a true triumph for Rarity to finish a dress. She turned her sewing machine off and pulled the dress free. Her magic brought it over to the empty manequin and dressed it. "Now, for the final touch." She turned to a table where she had the final necklace, only to find it missing. "Huh. Must have put it on already. She turned to the manequin again, only to find the dress. Nothing else. "Wait, where is the necklace?" She turned her attention to the other, dressed manequins. Not a stitch of jewelery to be seen.

The shrill scream that escaped her boutique startled every pony that could hear it.

The scene that Twilight came into was tragic. Rarity had sprawled herself out on her couch, truly distraught. Twilight cantered over for an inspection. "What's wrong?"

"It's a disaster!" Rarity cried. "The jewelery is gone."

She looked over the dresses, still wrapped around the mannequins. "The dresses look so good, though."

"The point of the show tonight was that the dresses were designed AROUND the jewelery. With no jewelery, there are no dresses, and no show." She rolled onto her belly in an undignified, unladylike manner.

"Maybe we can go look for and find the jewels for you. I could round up the girls and-"

"Take the whole week to find them. Twi, I trust you. I know you will find them. It'll take too long. The show is in a few hours."

"I know, but-"

"It's too late. Unless someone could quickly make some new pieces, then this show is not happening. Were are we going to find the materials, let alone someone who can make it? These were special order from Canterlot!"

Twilight sighed and looked at the dresses. The idea hit her quickly, and she turned to the door. "Got it. Rarity, I will meet you at the show. Bring your dresses." She went charging out of the boutique before the other unicorn could answer.

The sound of heavy hoof beats through his junk yard stopped Trinket dead in his tracks, just outside his workshop. He turned to watch the five, three on foot and two in the air, converge on him. "Trinket!" Twilight said. "We need your help. Are you busy?"

"Not yet," he said. "I just got back from installing the kid's play pirate ship. Why?"

Applejack smirked. "Gonna be hearing about that all week."

"Well, I hope they're good things." He stood a little taller, quite proud of his work.

"We need your expertise in making things," Twilight interrupted.

"Something broken?"

"You could say that," Applejack snorted. "Someone walked off with the jewelery for Rarity's fashion show tonight."

Trinket's expression soured. "Oh. Well, I'm sorry to hear that." He turned away and trotted for the workshop. "But I have other things to do."

"Geeze," Rainbow Dash crowed. "What's his problem?"

Twilight sighed. "She said some rather nasty things about his work earlier."

"That's right," he explained. "That's why I don't think I should help. Why would she let her models wear junk jewelery, anyway? Why should I help, if she's only going to insult me?"

"Because it's the nice thing to do," Dash said, zipping over his head.

"Like she was nice when she told me that my work is trash?"

"It'd be an opportunity to show your work isn't," Applejack commented. "Show off your stuff and all."

"You'd be able to get an apology out of Rarity," Fluttershy squeaked. "Um...if that's what you want..."

He looked at her, a quiet look on his face. She shrank back when he sighed. "I can already tell you're going to be persistant. Fine. Go get me some metal; I have it all in one place. Miss Sparkle, you're coming with me. I'll teach you how to clean, sand, and stain glass."

Rarity was panicking. The show was starting in five minutes, and there was no sign of Twilight or her jewelery. The models were shifting in their places, uncomfortable with Rarity's insistant pacing. Her normally well kept, styled hair was frizzy from worry, and her tail puffed up like Pinky Pie's.

"Where are they?" she worried. "This is going to be an even bigger disaster than before!"

"Perhaps we should call it off," one of the models suggested.

Rarity sighed. "I'll do it, then. Save you girls face." She looked towards the curtains and gulped. The crowd was not going to like it.

She was stopped from heading out, though, by a rainbow blur, which stopped before her. "And where do you think you're going?" Dash asked, a smile on her face.

"Rainbow!" She shied away. "Wh-what are you doing here?"

"The same thing we're all doing here," Twilight said as the rest of the group hurtled forward. "Supporting you."

"Line up, everypony," Applejack called out. "Jewelery ready to go." The models all trotted over to the mare, who had a satchel on her back. Dash and Fluttershy were quick to join her and start handing out the pieces of jewelery.

Rarity was in shock. Each piece was absolutely beautiful, and complimented the dresses as the real pieces. "Twilight...they're...perfect!" She stepped aside as the models lined up to walk the catwalk. One by one, they walked out; the girls listened as the crowed expressed their pleasure at the designs. Rarity stepped back as she looked, still disbelieving, at what she heard. She didn't even hear her cue, and had to be ushered out by her friends to take her bows and credit.

The after party was sureal for her. She spent a lot of time stumbling on her thank yous for the praise that was being heaped upon her. The dresses were fantasic. The jewelery was beautiful. Her talents had shone through once more.

It was making her dizzy.

The only thing she was concerned with was finding her friends. She found then swiftly, though it took a few fancy dodges of well wishers to get to them. "Hey!" She trotted up.

"That was a great show, Rarity!" Twilight said, smiling. "Glad it all worked out for you in the end."

"Well, thank you, Twili," she said, as flustered with this as every other mote of congradulations she'd received that night. "But this was really all because of you girls. Where did you find the jewelery?" Immediately, Dash and Applejack began snickering. It confused her. "What's so funny?"

"We didn't find the jewelery," Twilight admitted.

"Then the thief returned all of it?" Pinkie Pie began to snicker as well.

"Nope. We never found your jewelery," Twilight explained. "It's still lost."

"Then what are the model's wearing?"

"Those are just bits of polished metal and stained glass!" Applejack explained, low enough that nobody would hear.

"What?" Rarity's wonder was gone; her voice was now flat with the realization that her models were wearing costume jewelery.

"Yup!" Dash said, darting overhead. "Made it ourselves." It brightened Rarity's mood, knowing her friends had made the jewelery softened the blow quite a bit.

"Um..." Fluttershy lowered her head. "With Mr. Trinket's help, of course."

"What?"

"We went to Trinket's junk yard. He showed us how to polish and work the metal, how to sand and stain the glass, and how to set everything to remake the lost jewelery.

"You're welcome!" Pinkie exclaimed, perky as ever.

Rarity looked over at the models, who were chatting with after party guests. The jewelery that hung around their necks looked so real. Was that all Trinket's work? It couldn't have been! They couldn't be faked!

It was the niggling little voice in the back of her head that said otherwise. She knew her friends. They wouldn't lie to her. If they said they made the jewelery out of bits of trash, she knew there was reason to believe them.

The guests, of course, didn't seem to know in the least. She watched them admire her work, but most of all, the jewelery. The compliments were all about how her work was tied together by bits of metal and glass.

It was way too much for her. She bolted from the party, heading out of town.

The moonlight led the way, taking her down the path towards the junkyard. The doors were, surprisingly, open, which she took as an invitation to bolt right in.

She found the brown-coated unicorn sitting on the roof of his workshop, laying on his back and looking at the moon. Without hesitation, she bounded up the nearest pile of garbage and onto the roof, which drew his attention. "Trinket?"

"Oh! Hello Miss Rarity." He rolled over and sat up. "Party over already?"

"No. I just needed some fresh air."

"So you came to the junkyard." She smiled at his joke; he was right.

"I...have a reason." She sauntered up and sat down across from him. "What are you doing out here?"

"Eh. Stargazing. Enjoying what Luna gives to us this evening." He looked up at the moon and smiled.

"Ah." She looked up at the moon. "My friends say that you had a hoof in my success tonight."

"I did."

"But I was so mean to you earlier."

"They pointed something out to me, though. It was the right thing to do. Your jewels were stolen. It would take forever to find them again. They didn't have time, but I could easily fix the problem. So...I did. Simple as that."

"Well, everybody loved it."

"Good." He rolled onto his belly and looked at her expectantly.

"...thank you, Trinket."

He smiled. "Just promise me you'll remember what happened tonight."

She nodded. "Okay. I understand."

"Good." He rolled onto his side again and looked at the stars. "You're more than welcome to stay and watch the stars with me, if you'd like. That's where real beauty is."

She smiled and got comfortable. "Thanks. I think I will."

End

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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*stares at the bottle of whiskey. Gently unloads it and takes a healthy drink*

So, apparently, I did a MLP thing.
This story has been sitting in my backlog for...a couple of months now, begging to be finished. So I finished it. It's done.
I'm not gonna bother editing it and just stick it in scraps. Enjoy it if you're into it. It's got the Mane 6 in it. Rarity gets hers.

Trinket's my OC pony, apparently. I guess this means I need to get him drawn.

I don't know what bothers me more: the fact that I did this or the fact that I have another idea for poor Trinket.

I'm gonna need something stronger than Whiskey.

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Published: 5 years, 1 month ago
Rating: General

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