Welcome to Inkbunny...
Allowed ratings
To view member-only content, create an account. ( Hide )
Flight of the Peregrine Ch. 3
« older
VerbMyNoun
VerbMyNoun's Gallery (4)

Flight of the Peregrine Ch. 4

flight_of_the_peregrine_ch._4_complete_.doc
Keywords male 844285, female 725222, cat 148262, canine 122636, dog 112101, feline 102353, hedgehog 59800, horse 46145, bat 26428, otter 26308, rodent 22667, bird 22444, squirrel 21485, m 20644, deer 18275, woman 18268, reptile 18236, f 17281, lizard 17061, man 12819, shark 12264, mustelid 5723, bovine 5722, pig 5592, bull 5164, badger 4469, cervine 4105, sci-fi 3478, owl 3271, polar bear 2717, scifi 2347, golden retriever 1917, science fiction 1094, antelope 1053, liger 1028, iguana 709, hog 463, sci fi 398, snowy owl 233, white-tailed deer 39, european otter 31, springbok 22, european hedgehog 12, eastern gray squirrel 4, tricolored bat 4, eastern pipistrelle 4, hanoverian horse 3

Recap


Chief Psychologist Mason Delaney has been counseling the crew of the Peregrine in individual sessions. Despite the drastic physiological changes, the general morale of the ship seems to be positive. It appears that having everyone transform has helped with the adjustment, rather than only a few. Most are thankful to still be alive and are looking forward to getting planetside. Only a handful are resentful of their new bodies, or are mourning the passing of a loved one.

Meanwhile, the saboteur has been captured, and through a clever ruse, has divulged her name and which faction she belongs to: the Pacific Union, their closest ally...



Hope Driscoll: 38, female, Captain of the Atlantic Collaborative Interstellar Colonization Ship “Peregrine,” from Cleveland, Ohio, European Otter
Jackson Cordero: 35, male, First Officer and Chief Communications Officer, from Burlington, Vermont, White-tailed Deer
Tristan Yount: 36, male, Chief Medical Officer, from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Golden Retriever
Emma Thorisdottir: 28, female, Chief Engineer, from Hӧfn, Iceland, European Hedgehog
Oliver Thibault: 42, male, Chief of Security, from Hamilton, Ontario, Unidentified Shark
Natalie Ingram: 24, female, Navigator, from Freehold, New Jersey, Siberian Hamster
Helena Sensabaugh: 54, female, Governor, from Bonaventure, Quebec, Hanoverian Horse
Sara Hoy: 30, female, Acting Chief of Security, from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Tricolored Bat
George Woodbourne: 53, male, Engineer, from Charleston, West Virginia, Polar Bear
Adam Keller: 41, male, Engineer, from Bangor, Maine, Liger
David Owens: 49, male, Acting Assistant Chief of Security, from Ottawa, Ontario, Black Jaguar
Alita Smythe: 34, female, Communications Officer, from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Corgi
James Grant: 32, male, Communications Officer, from Morgantown, West Virginia, Pale-throated Sloth
Jason Mitchell: 42, male, Communications Officer, from Trenton, New Jersey, Bearded Dragon
Lilly Waterford: 31, female, Medical Officer, from Erie, Pennsylvania, Virginia Opossum
Joshua Madden: 33, male, Security Officer, from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Suffolk Punch Horse
Talon Bonadell: 29, male, Security Officer, from Syracuse, New York, Elkhound
 Michael Tisdale: 36, male, Engineer, from Quebec City, Quebec, Black Leopard
Trisha Huntsman: 44, female, Medical Officer, from Cincinnati, Ohio, Panda Bear
Rachel Callaway: 33, female, Intelligence Specialist, from Modesto, California, Human
AISHA: Artificial Intelligence designed to assist with the operation of the “Peregrine”, appears as a holographic projection of either a human or a human-Peregrine falcon hybrid



Flight of the Peregrine

Chapter 4: False Intelligence

-----


UTC 2457-09-23-16-19-09

“Take me to the bridge,” Specialist Callaway ordered. “I need to get word to The Orca.”

“As you wish, Captain,” the holographic projection replied, gesturing to the door of the holding cell as it opened with a whoosh. The holograph reappeared out in the main corridor. “Right this way.”

“What about the planet?” Rachel asked. “Is it habitable? Are there any locals we should be concerned about?”

“Initial scans indicate that the atmosphere contains dangerously high levels of Fluorine,” the program answered as they walked towards the bridge. “However, the atmospheric processors provided for this mission could have the air breathable within four years. Additional scans will be necessary to determine agricultural viability and the safety of the water. My long-range sensors do not show any other civilizations in this system, but residual alpha particles indicate that other spacefaring cultures frequently pass through the Io System.”

“Thank you,” the woman responded as they entered the lift to take them to the bridge. “I’m sorry. What is your designation?”

“I am called AISHA, Captain,” the holographic woman said.

“It’s nice to meet you, AISHA,” Rachel replied. “I suppose it’s just going to be the two of us until support arrives from the PU. What recreational activities are there on board this ship?”

“The console in your cabin has a catalog of classic video games and movies,” the projection explained. “There is also a fitness center, which includes an indoor track, a swimming pool, and a weight room.”

“And that’s it?”

“This ship had a military crew, Captain,” the holograph answered, before flickering out.

“Great,” Specialist Callaway muttered as she stepped out onto the empty bridge of The Peregrine. “I’m dozens of light years away from the closest humans and my only entertainment is an AI.” AISHA reappeared in front of her. “No offense.”

“As I am not programmed to be an optimal companion, and lack emotion, I take no offense to your statement, Captain.”

“I don’t need an explanation every time I treat you like another human,” Rachel explained. “Just accept the apology.”

“Understood,” AISHA said. “Apology accepted.”

“Right. Now then, I want you to create a new subspace communication. Frequency ID Six-Two-Foxtrot-Nine-Five-Kilo. Copy message to ID Six-Two-Papa-Three-Eight-Yankee, additional copy to ID Six-Two-Whiskey-One-Zero-Victor,” Rachel ordered. “Message: Arrived at Io. Peregrine crew and passengers deceased due to sabotage error. Planet viable with minimal work. No other advanced life in system. Signs of interstellar traffic through system. Awaiting further orders. Signature Echo-Five-Three-Two-Two.” Looking at AISHA, she stated, “Repeat that back to me, please.”

“Frequency ID Six-Two-Foxtrot-Nine-Five-Kilo,” AISHA repeated. “Copy message to ID Six-Two-Papa-Three-Eight-Yankee, additional copy to ID Six-Two-Whiskey-One-Zero-Victor. Message: Arrived at Io. Peregrine crew and passengers deceased due to sabotage error. Planet viable with minimal work. No other advanced life in system. Signs of interstellar traffic through system. Awaiting further orders. Signature Echo-Five-Three-Two-Two.”

“Excellent,” Rachel said. “Please send.”

“Message sent, Captain.”

“Thank you, AISHA,” the woman replied as she turned back towards the lift. “Now take me to the observation lounge. I’d like to look out at our new home while I eat.” AISHA reappeared next to her inside the lift and the ride passed in silence. As she exited into the corridor that led to the lounge, she asked, “AISHA, do you know whether or not the crew and passengers suffered before they died?”

“I do not believe so, Captain,” the holograph answered. “Research has shown that the human body and mind cannot feel pain while in stasis.”

“Thank God,” she sighed as she followed the projection down the hallway. “They weren’t supposed to die, you know. Especially not like that.” An involuntary shudder passed through her body.

“Captain, I am incapable of forming opinions regarding ethics and morality,” ASIHA responded. “I cannot judge you for your actions or their results.”

“No. No, I suppose not,” Rachel sighed as they reached the starboard observation lounge. “I’d prefer to be left alone while I eat, AISHA. I will call for you after I have eaten and have you escort me to my cabin. You are dismissed.”

“Yes, Captain,” the holograph replied before disappearing.



UTC 2457-09-23-16-41-12

“Son of a bitch,” Lieutenant Hoy exclaimed once the pillar of light surrounding Jackson changed back to blue. “The PU are supposed to be our allies!”

“Did you get those subspace IDs and her identification?” the deer asked Captain Driscoll as he stepped out of the light column.

“We did,” the otter woman answered with a grin. “Great job, Commander.”

“It was Mason’s idea,” the Commander said. “I just executed it.”

“Flawlessly,” the springbok pointed out. “She didn’t suspect a thing.”

“Lieutenant, take a team and secure our guest back inside her cell,” Hope ordered. “Jackson, Mason, Governor, you’re with me. Let’s send our friends in the Pacific Union a message.”

“Shouldn’t we press the prisoner for more information before we send a message?” Governor Sensabaugh asked as they fell in line behind the captain.

“There may not be time for that,” Jackson explained. “For all we know whoever she was reaching out to was following us in FTL and could be here any moment.”

“Exactly,” Hope said as they walked towards the lift. “We need to get ahead of this mess and take control of the narrative immediately. With any luck we can wave them off before they arrive.”

“But what are we going to tell them?” the mare asked.

“Personally, I’d suggest saying that the Krys arrived before we did,” Mason answered. “A colonization ship wouldn’t have the resources necessary to take the planet, let alone defend itself against them.”

“That’s a good idea,” Captain Driscoll said as they stepped into the elevator. “Any other suggestions?”

“I’m sure Specialist Callaway has to be a valuable asset for them to assign her to this mission,” the stag responded. “They might tell her to hold her position and await retrieval. If they do, our ruse is shot to hell. We need to make them believe a rescue is either too dangerous or impossible.”

“We could say the Krys attacked the ship and life support is failing,” Helena suggested.

The springbok shook his head. “The Krys would try to take the ship intact rather than destroy it, and The Peregrine isn’t armed heavily enough to put up a fight.”

“So we say the Krys took the ship when it dropped out of FTL,” the otter woman concluded as the lift opened onto the bridge. “What about the status of the crew?”

“If we say the crew survived, it’s possible the PU would launch a rescue mission. I know the planets they were assigned in the lottery weren’t as nice as Io-2d, but they were also closer to Earth,” the governor explained. “It’s possible that they established a successful colony and have had over a century to build an armada. They could attempt a recovery mission and with the intention of absorbing us into their ranks.”

“No, I think we should stick with our prisoner’s original message, that the sabotage failed and all crew and passengers died in cryo,” Hope countered. “But then the Krys captured the ship upon exiting FTL and she woke up planetside. They would no doubt detect her transmission and track her down before she could escape.”

“Sounds brilliant,” Jackson replied as he took his post on the bridge while the others gathered around him. He keyed in the subspace frequencies they’d obtained earlier from their captive, then spoke aloud as he typed the new message. “Avoid Io. Heavy Krys activity in system. Peregrine captured. All crew and passengers died in cryo. Likely due to sabotage error. Transmitting likely to alert enemy to position. Capture probable. It has been an honor to serve. Signature Echo-Five-Three-Two-Two.” He looked up at the others and asked, “How does that sound?”

“How about ‘Heavy Krys presence?’” Mason asked. “Specialist Callaway’s original message seemed like she prefers to use as few words as possible in her reports.”

“Good catch,” Hope said. “Make the change and send it.  Now, what do we tell the rest of the Atlantic Collective?”

“What do you mean?” Helena asked. “We tell them the truth.”

“Are you sure? I honestly don’t feel completely comfortable with inviting a bunch of humans to come share our home with us,” Mason interjected. “Just think back to what humanity did to all the animals back on Earth. Hell, think of what they did to the Earth, and I mean long before the Krys came along.”

“Right,” Jackson agreed. “The fact of the matter is that we aren’t human anymore. What does that mean in terms of us being a part of the Atlantic Collaborative?”

“I propose we send another fake message and attempt to gauge whether or not The Gyrfalcon and The Merlin were successful in their missions,” the otter woman stated. “It may be possible that they found homes and established colonies already, or that their ships were destroyed. If that’s the case, then they don’t need to know that we made it. If they’re still wandering the stars, then we tell them the truth and invite them to join us.”

“I know the AC is expecting to hear from us soon, but we’re still a democracy,” Helena said. “I say we gather up everyone who’s been revived so far. We explain our options and take a vote. While we’re at it, we can decide what to do with Special Agent Callaway.”



UTC 2457-09-23-18-01-06

Two hundred and ninety revived crewmen and civilian engineers sat gathered in the mess hall, while twenty-four more crewmen and women watched from the bridge and the three security officers assigned to guard the prisoner listened over the comms. Jackson stood at the front of the room with Captain Driscoll, Chief Yount, Chief Thorisdottir, and Lieutenant Hoy, watching on as Governor Sensabaugh addressed the crowd.

“Thank you all for coming,” the mare began. “I know some of you are just coming out of stasis and haven’t yet been briefed as to the current state of affairs. No doubt you feel some confusion, which is understandable. So for those who aren’t up to speed just yet, here’s what we know so far. I’ll start with the good news first. We reached Io-2d safely. We do not detect any civilizations in the system, and travel through the system appears to be infrequent. All of our scans indicate that Io-2d can sustain human life with minimal terraforming, and we anticipate that we should be able to send down a landing party soon to do some reconnaissance and exploring.”

Helena paused to let everyone process what she’d said so far, allowing a quiet murmur to spread through the room while people exchanged comments between themselves. After a minute or so, she held up her right arm and the crowd quieted down. “Now, for the bad news. Obviously, something happened to us during our time in cryogenic stasis. Our AI was hacked shortly after we left Earth and our cryo pods sabotaged. Apparently the goal of our attackers was to use the stasis tubes to alter our DNA and turn us into livestock, then swoop in and claim 2d as their own, with a substantial supply of fresh meat ready and waiting.”

This caused another outburst from the room, but they didn’t calm down when she raised her arm, so Hope let out a shrill whistle and shouted, “I expect better discipline from my crew! Settle down and let the governor speak, or I’ll have security put you in a cell!” The crowd calmed down immediately, and Governor Sensabaugh continued.

“We don’t know why, but rather than transform into farm animals, it seems we all changed into half-human hybrids of our favorite animals. Unfortunately, the forty-seven who transformed into insects, arachnids, mollusks, or crustaceans perished during the process. Others of us metamorphosed into half-aquatic hybrids and are still in stasis, Security Chief Thibault among them. In his absence, Assistant Chief Lieutenant Hoy is in charge of security. She led a mixed team of Security, Medical, and Engineering to collect the deceased and locate the party responsible for this act of espionage. She attempted to contact her superiors with a mission report, but we were able to intercept the message and edit it to suit our purposes. We have this individual in custody, a Special Operative from the Pacific Union, and in a bit we are going to take a vote to decide her fate. We’re also going to take a vote on what these changes mean for us regarding our place within the Atlantic Collaborative. Are there any questions?”

Nearly four dozen arms shot up around the room. Helena picked out an older polar bear in a green uniform near the front-center and said, “You there, Engineer…?”

The white-furred man stood up and introduced himself. “Engineer George Woodbourne, Ma’am. Is there any way to reverse these transformations?”

Chief Thorisdottir stepped forward to answer the question. “Hi, George. AISHA has run several simulations with inconclusive results. At best, it would take nearly one hundred fifty Earth years to undo. The worst case scenario is death.”

“Thank you, Chief,” the ursine man said as he sat back down.

The governor next called on a panther hybrid wearing a blue uniform, marking him as a member of the Security team. “Yes, Mister Owens?”

Security Officer Owens rose up to his feet and spoke with a slight Welsh accent. “Thank you, Governor. I noticed earlier you said that 2d could sustain human life with minimal terraforming. That’s all well and good, but we aren’t humans anymore. How will these changes affect our ability to adapt to a new world?”

This time it was Chief Yount who handled the question, stating, “The civil engineers are gathering data about the planet’s ecosystem now. Meanwhile, we’ve gathered DNA samples from most of you when you woke up from stasis, and AISHA is running several simulations including your adaptability to the climate on 2d, as well as your genetic compatibility with other hybrid species for procreation.”

“That’s good to know,” the panther said with a nod before taking his seat. “Thanks, Doc.”

A Corgi woman in the yellow uniform of Communications caught the mare’s attention next. “You there, Comms Officer…?”

“Smythe, Ma’am. Alita Smythe,” the woman replied. “I was wondering why the Pacific Union would sabotage an Atlantic Collaborative ship, considering we were allies before leaving Earth?” A low murmur of agreement spread through the crowd, but quieted quickly as Jackson stepped forth to answer.

“While we don’t know for certain yet, we suspect that PU leadership had very little faith in their odds for success,” the stag explained. “The Peregrine was assigned to the world with the best calculated viability, while the Pacific Union only got one planet in the top ten and three in the bottom ten.”

“Thank you, Sir, that makes a lot of sense,” Alita said before sitting back down.

“Excuse me for interrupting, but I have a communication from an Admiral Pelletier of New Montreal,” a male sloth said on the viewscreen from the bridge. “It’s for Special Agent Callaway.”

“Put it through to the captain’s datapad, James,” Jackson said. He glanced at Hope, who gave him a quick nod before disappearing into the kitchen. He stepped back and let Helena continue the town hall meeting.

“Okay, who’s next? You there,” the governor said, pointing to a man that looked like mix of lion and tiger. “What’s your name?”

“Keller, ma’am,” the liger replied as he stood. “Corporal Adam Keller, Engineering.”

“All right, Corporal,” Helena commented. “What’s your question?”

“I was just wondering, if we’re all half-animals now, what will that mean as far as our consumption of animal meat?” the liger asked. “The nutrient packs are going to run out eventually, and I can only speak for myself, but I have no plans on going vegan.”

“I’m glad you asked,” Chief Yount responded as he addressed the crowd. “We were going to discuss that here shortly, but this seems like as good a time as any. Yes, the replicators will run out sooner or later, which is why so many people are still in cryo. Those of us who are now carnivorous hybrids will no doubt crave meat, and might have trouble controlling their urges to feed on a vegan or vegetarian diet. On the other hand, being half-animal hybrids ourselves now only further complicates the centuries old dilemma whether slaughtering animals for food is ethical. It’s one of the issues we plan on voting on at the end of this meeting.”

“I’m just saying, I don’t think I can give up bacon,” the liger retorted, causing several chuckles to break out around the room.

“As your physician, I have to advise you to limit how much of it you eat,” Tristan warned before adding, “but I completely understand what you mean.”

Just then, Captain Driscoll emerged from the kitchen. Looking at Jackson first, then Sara, she said, “We’ll be right back with our stowaway. She should be here for the rest of this meeting.”

“Owens, you’re with us,” the bat woman said to her acting assistant as they headed out the door.



UTC 2457-09-23-18-52-43

As the quartet neared the starboard observation lounge, the two security officers guarding the door, the elkhound and suffolk punch horse that were standing guard gave a salute. “At ease, Madden, Bonadell,” Sara said with a dismissive wave. “How’s our guest?”

“She’s been raising hell off and on for the past hour or so,” the elkhound, Bonadell, answered. “She’s being quiet for now, but I expect she’ll be starting up again in another couple of minutes.”

“I’m sure she will,” Hope said, holding out her hand. “Give me and Commander Cordero your tasers. We’re going inside for a little chat.” The two sentries handed over their AC-64 Loki tasers, while Lieutenant Hoy and Lieutenant JG Owens drew their own tasers from their holsters. Looking at the horse man standing guard, she ordered, “Open the door, Madden.”

Special Agent Rachel Callaway was sitting inside on the floor with her back to the wall, but quickly sprang to her feet when the door opened. “What the hell is go-” she started to ask in a demanding tone of voice, but she stopped short when she saw the otter, deer, bat, and panther walk inside with tasers pointed in her direction.

“Rachel Callaway,” the otter woman said, “I’m Captain Hope Driscoll of the ACS Peregrine. This is my first officer, Commander Jackson Cordero, acting Chief of Security Sara Hoy, and acting Assistant Chief of Security David Owens.”

“Captain,” the human woman replied, “I recognize your voice. Your AI convinced me that you were dead. All of you. I know you probably won’t believe this, but I’m relieved to see that isn’t the case.”

“That was a ruse on my part,” Jackson commented. “AISHA is a horrible liar, but she has a puppet function that allows a user to control her speech and actions.”

“We overheard your message to the Orca,” Hope explained. “We made certain edits to make sure the Pacific Union wouldn’t be coming, and sent it off using your authentication codes. We just received a response that I think you should hear. Please, sit with us.” Jackson followed the captain’s lead and casually took a seat at the closest table, while their captive hesitantly sat across from them.

“So, what did the message say?”

“First, I’ll tell you what our edited version of your status report said,” the deer answered as he retrieved it on his datapad. “Avoid Io. Heavy Krys activity in system. Peregrine captured. All crew and passengers died in cryo. Likely due to sabotage error. Transmitting likely to alert enemy to position. Capture probable. It has been an honor to serve. Signature Echo-Five-Three-Two-Two.”

“Clearly you exaggerated about the deaths,” the woman stated.

“To an extent,” Jackson responded, “As you can see, we turned into half-human hybrids of our favorite animals. However, everyone that turned into arachnids or anything else with an exoskeleton died in the process. We showed you pictures of them.”

“I see,” Agent Callaway stated. “And what was the reply?”

Reading from her own datapad, Hope replied, “Special Agent Callaway; I am truly saddened by the fate of the Peregrine. We do not condone your actions, but we do forgive you. The crew of the ACS Merlin established a new human colony on Keppler-186f, now known as New Montreal. The ACS Gyrfalcon joined later after failing to find a habitable planet. Unfortunately, the Pacific Union Ship Bottlenose also entered Krys-controlled space and was captured. The PUS Orca and PUS Narwhal were both unsuccessful in their missions and were invited to join New Montreal. The Atlantic Collaborative and Pacific Union no longer exist, at least not on Keppler-186f. Due to the merger, we are able to confirm your orders from Captain Usman and recognize you as a citizen of New Montreal, and will honor your sacrifice with a military funeral. Thank you for your service. Sincerely, Admiral Emmanuel Fletcher. Signature Alpha-Four-One-Seven-Nine.”

“That was Captain Usman’s authentication number,” Special Agent Callaway remarked.

“Sounds like your one of us now,” Jackson replied.

“The question is, what do we do with you?” Hope asked.



End Ch. 4
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
page
1
page
2
page
3
page
4
page
5
page
6
page
7
page
8
page
9
page
10
page
11
page
12
page
13
page
14
page
15
page
16
page
17
page
18
page
19
page
20
page
21
page
22
page
23
page
24
page
25
page
26
page
27
page
28
page
29
page
30
page
31
page
32
page
33
page
34
page
35
page
36
page
37
page
38
page
39
page
40
page
41
page
42
page
43
page
44
page
45
page
46
page
47
page
48
page
49
page
50
page
51
page
52
page
53
page
54
page
55
page
56
page
57
page
58
page
59
page
60
page
61
page
62
page
63
page
64
page
65
page
66
page
67
page
68
page
69
page
70
page
71
page
72
page
73
page
74
page
75
page
76
page
77
page
78
page
79
page
80
page
81
page
82
page
83
page
84
page
85
page
86
page
87
page
88
page
89
page
90
page
91
page
92
page
93
page
94
page
95
page
96
page
97
page
98
page
99
page
100
page
101
page
102
page
103
page
104
page
105
page
106
page
107
page
108
page
109
page
110
page
111
page
112
page
113
page
114
page
115
page
116
page
117
page
118
page
119
page
120
page
121
page
122
page
123
page
124
page
125
page
126
page
127
page
128
page
129
page
130
page
131
page
132
page
133
page
134
page
135
page
136
page
137
page
138
page
139
page
140
page
141
page
142
page
143
page
144
page
145
page
146
page
147
page
148
page
149
page
150
page
151
page
152
page
153
page
154
page
155
page
156
page
157
page
158
page
159
page
160
page
161
page
162
page
163
page
164
page
165
page
166
page
167
page
168
page
169
page
170
page
171
page
172
page
173
page
174
page
175
page
176
page
177
page
178
page
179
page
180
page
181
page
182
page
183
page
184
page
185
page
186
page
187
page
188
page
189
page
190
page
191
page
192
page
193
page
194
page
195
page
196
page
197
page
198
page
199
page
200
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
next
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
previous
page
 
 
page
1
page
2
page
3
page
4
page
5
page
6
page
7
page
8
page
9
page
10
page
11
page
12
page
13
page
14
page
15
page
16
page
17
page
18
page
19
page
20
page
21
page
22
page
23
page
24
page
25
page
26
page
27
page
28
page
29
page
30
page
31
page
32
page
33
page
34
page
35
page
36
page
37
page
38
page
39
page
40
page
41
page
42
page
43
page
44
page
45
page
46
page
47
page
48
page
49
page
50
page
51
page
52
page
53
page
54
page
55
page
56
page
57
page
58
page
59
page
60
page
61
page
62
page
63
page
64
page
65
page
66
page
67
page
68
page
69
page
70
page
71
page
72
page
73
page
74
page
75
page
76
page
77
page
78
page
79
page
80
page
81
page
82
page
83
page
84
page
85
page
86
page
87
page
88
page
89
page
90
page
91
page
92
page
93
page
94
page
95
page
96
page
97
page
98
page
99
page
100
page
101
page
102
page
103
page
104
page
105
page
106
page
107
page
108
page
109
page
110
page
111
page
112
page
113
page
114
page
115
page
116
page
117
page
118
page
119
page
120
page
121
page
122
page
123
page
124
page
125
page
126
page
127
page
128
page
129
page
130
page
131
page
132
page
133
page
134
page
135
page
136
page
137
page
138
page
139
page
140
page
141
page
142
page
143
page
144
page
145
page
146
page
147
page
148
page
149
page
150
page
151
page
152
page
153
page
154
page
155
page
156
page
157
page
158
page
159
page
160
page
161
page
162
page
163
page
164
page
165
page
166
page
167
page
168
page
169
page
170
page
171
page
172
page
173
page
174
page
175
page
176
page
177
page
178
page
179
page
180
page
181
page
182
page
183
page
184
page
185
page
186
page
187
page
188
page
189
page
190
page
191
page
192
page
193
page
194
page
195
page
196
page
197
page
198
page
199
page
200
Flight of the Peregrine Ch. 3
Last in pool
Thanks to Thanks to
Neosate
Neosate
,
daveb63
daveb63
and
Cormenthor
Cormenthor
for their feedback.

All characters © ne.

Keywords
male 844,285, female 725,222, cat 148,262, canine 122,636, dog 112,101, feline 102,353, hedgehog 59,800, horse 46,145, bat 26,428, otter 26,308, rodent 22,667, bird 22,444, squirrel 21,485, m 20,644, deer 18,275, woman 18,268, reptile 18,236, f 17,281, lizard 17,061, man 12,819, shark 12,264, mustelid 5,723, bovine 5,722, pig 5,592, bull 5,164, badger 4,469, cervine 4,105, sci-fi 3,478, owl 3,271, polar bear 2,717, scifi 2,347, golden retriever 1,917, science fiction 1,094, antelope 1,053, liger 1,028, iguana 709, hog 463, sci fi 398, snowy owl 233, white-tailed deer 39, european otter 31, springbok 22, european hedgehog 12, eastern gray squirrel 4, tricolored bat 4, eastern pipistrelle 4, hanoverian horse 3
Details
Type: Writing - Document
Published: 1 year, 3 months ago
Rating: General

MD5 Hash for Page 1... Show Find Identical Posts [?]
Stats
73 views
3 favorites
1 comment

BBCode Tags Show [?]
 
Furlips
1 year, 3 months ago
Welcome back dear.

Hugs.

Bunners
New Comment:
Move reply box to top
Log in or create an account to comment.