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dmfalk

A familiar place in unfamiliar light....

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If ever there was a place I'd love to shoot some infrared photos & videos at, it would be this very familiar place....

One, two, three.

d.m.f.

Viewed: 10 times
Added: 5 years ago
 
CyberCornEntropic
5 years ago
But what color would the rubber-headed lizard alien be? :o
dmfalk
5 years ago
Good question! Depends on the rubber, dyes, ink and paint used, but a fair bet, probably about the sane as the rocks. (Just because something is green doesn't mean it'll have a secondary infrared reflection.)

I figured you would recognise Vasquez Rocks, due to its several appearances across the various Trek series... :)

d.m.f.
CyberCornEntropic
5 years ago
I figure the same color (thereabouts) as the rocks would be most likely as it would make for the best camouflage, not that the match under the Metron sun or in their atmosphere would have been as good as that of the Gorn homeworld.  (Good thing for Kirk human vision ranges more towards the UV end of the spectrum compared to that of most aliens. ;p )

I certainly did recognize the rocks you linked to.  They were very prominent in the episode. :p
dmfalk
5 years ago
And in several other episodes, particularly "Shore Leave" (the Ruth, Finnigan and strafing-fighter scenes, especially), and the TNG episode with the primitive world of distant cousins of the Vulcans (the hideaway is on the other side of that outcropping).

As vegetation is very bright in infrared, it's why the vegetation in these colour infrared photos appear golden/amber, as the infrared component is mostly in the red channel. (The photos are actually colour-swapped, red-for-blue, blue-for-red, so if we saw the photos before colour-swapping, the vegetation would look closer to a light cyan.)

Human vision is centered on greenish-yellow, but it wouldn't be surprising for worlds of an orange or red sun (such as low-mass red dwarf stars, like Gliese 581), the center colour would indeed shift to the red, or even just below. A clear sky would be much darker to a native, compared to what we would see, and haze would be nonexistent. All vegetation would be quite bright, though. But to human eyes? Fields of pink, orange, brown, red, magenta and yellow.

d.m.f.
(Yes, there is a very reasonable scientific explanation for
Poem: Pink and Yellow Fields (A tribute to Gliese 581) by dmfalk
my poem, "Pink and Yellow Fields"... :) )
CyberCornEntropic
5 years ago
" dmfalk wrote:
And in several other episodes, particularly "Shore Leave" (the Ruth, Finnigan and strafing-fighter scenes, especially), and the TNG episode with the primitive world of distant cousins of the Vulcans (the hideaway is on the other side of that outcropping).

True, and it represented Sherman's Planet in the Star Trek: Customizable Card Game.  However, I remember it best as having a conveniently placed rock for conking Gorn noggins. :p

" As vegetation is very bright in infrared, it's why the vegetation in these colour infrared photos appear golden/amber, as the infrared component is mostly in the red channel. (The photos are actually colour-swapped, red-for-blue, blue-for-red, so if we saw the photos before colour-swapping, the vegetation would look closer to a light cyan.)

However, flowers themselves tend to be very bright in ultraviolet (probably as high contrast against the foliage), which birds and bugs can see.

The monochromatic eyesight of most mammals developed in response to a nocturnal way of life back in the early days of dinosaur supremacy.  It's basically the blue end of the spectrum rather than true black-and-white (achromatism).  For creatures like dogs, snow really does appear yellow.

In their antiquity, primates lost their ability to detect pheromones in order to redevelop dichromatic vision (good for seeing brightly-colored fruits among the vegetation).  However, the ancestral color range, from before the days of dinosaurian authoritarianism, was most likely the trichromatic vision birds still boast.
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