Welcome to Inkbunny...
Allowed ratings
To view member-only content, create an account. ( Hide )
axlegear

Penis Bandwidth

Charge1Shot: Average Human Penis Bandwidth

1. The human cell contains 75 MB of genetic information
2. A sperm 37.5 MB.
3. In a milliliter, we have 100 million sperms.
On average, one ejaculation releases 2.25 ml in 5 seconds.

Using basic math we can compute the bandwidth of the human male penis as:
(37.5MB x 100M x 2.25)/5 = (37,500,000 bytes/sperm x 100,000,000 sperm/ml x 2.25 ml) / 5 seconds = 1,687,500,000,000,000 bytes/sec = 1,687.5 TerraBytes/sec

<hypnosis> 11 men would give 17 petabytes/sec
Charge1Shot: The point is that you're better off getting fucked in the ass than dealing with Comcast.
Viewed: 18 times
Added: 5 years, 4 months ago
 
Kadm
5 years, 4 months ago
I'm in for that deal. But it's not a very symmetric connection, is it?
Ramblo
5 years, 4 months ago
Only gay males in particular configurations will be able to negotiate peering agreements, it seems.
Kadm
5 years, 4 months ago
Those are going to be some very peculiar configurations if you want to transmit with low latency. This method sounds more suitable for high-volume low-priority traffic.

I'm not sure what kind of SLA you could get on it, either. Downtime seems unpredictable. Has anyone calculated the rate factoring in the time between transmissions, as it were?
LupineAssassin
5 years, 4 months ago
NICE!
faunoiphilia
5 years, 4 months ago
lol. where did you get the initial 37.5 MB and 75 MB from, though?
axlegear
5 years, 4 months ago
Approximation of the average size of a human DNA strand.  With both chromosomes, it's roughly 75MB, and a sperm carries only one chromosome (the other is in the egg)
faunoiphilia
5 years, 4 months ago
I understand why the haploid cells are half of the gametes but i don't understand how you can convert the length of the DNA strand into an amount of data.

I'm a chemist.... how much does each nucleotide base contribute? what about each phosphorous group? deoxyribose?
or are you going by bond energy as if burning a sample in a calorimeter? joules/calories/Calories? I don't get where you got that number from. Basically, i was just asking for a source since i don't think you calculated that first number yourself.
Ramblo
5 years, 4 months ago
Googling produces absurdly wide ranging results. One website calculated 1.5GB for just one copy of the genome, which seems reasonable given Wikipedia's numbers.

"6×10^9 base pairs/diploid genome x 1 byte/4 base pairs = 1.5×10^9 bytes or 1.5 Gigabytes"
http://bitesizebio.com/articles/how-much-information-i...

re-running axle's numbers, that is 33.75 Petabytes/sec
axlegear
5 years, 4 months ago
If you want sources, you'll have to ask Charge1shot on Steam, since he's where I got it from.  x.x


(Why would anyone be this aggressively requesting of proof for a simple joke?)
faunoiphilia
5 years, 4 months ago
well:
1. it's not a joke
2. I'm a nerd and I'm legitimately interested in it so i want to be sure the information is straight

I'm not being agressive; i was iterating why i asked the question in the first place since you didn't answer it the first time. Even the other guy that chimed in didn't answer the question. he provided a ratio (4 nucleotide bases = 1 byte) but still didn't say how that's figured or if the "nucleotide bases" includes the deoxyribose or phosphate groups. I guess in this case the coding is the only information that's being counted but it still doesn't explain how you figure how many bytes a nucleotide base is. that's what i'm interested in.
I got the point of the joke; i just wanted to know the science behind it. i don't see how that's offensive.
ChipmunkClunk
5 years, 4 months ago
nice.
New Comment:
Move reply box to top
Log in or create an account to comment.