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Brainsister

Definition of a Pony

What a pony is:
Any breed of horse under (I believe) five hands in height at the withers as an adult.

What a pony is not:
A baby/adolescent horse. That is called a foal.

I really don't know how, but I keep seeing people who think a pony is a baby horse, and as someone who grew up around horses, this makes my head hurt.
Viewed: 110 times
Added: 5 years, 9 months ago
 
elix
5 years, 9 months ago
People also complain that the Internet is broken if they can't get to Facebook. Yay ignorance!
Nishi
5 years, 9 months ago
I didn't know! :O I never really thought about what a pony was compared to a horse. But I figured they could come in all ages. I remember someone once complaining that the mane 6 were all underage, but seeing as how they have jobs and seem older and mature and all, maybe they just had this confusion!
Brainsister
5 years, 9 months ago
Now you know the ponyfacts! And yeah, I have a feeling a lot of them were making that mistake.
HRaiden
5 years, 9 months ago
I always thought ponies were small horses.
Brainsister
5 years, 9 months ago
That they are.
MrSOCKS
5 years, 9 months ago
Aren't young/juvinile horses called "colts"..?
Foals are of course anything from newborns to what, three months. Even the act of equine birth is called "foaling".
Brainsister
5 years, 9 months ago
Colts are just male foals. (Female foals are fillies)
MrSOCKS
5 years, 9 months ago
I thought a Filly was the same as a Heifer: a female who has yet to foal..? After she foals,  she becomes a Mare, right?
Brainsister
5 years, 9 months ago
There seem to be a few different definitions, but most often it's a female under four years of age.
MrSOCKS
5 years, 9 months ago
Okay, then.
I shouldn't be needing this lesson in equine vernacular.
Damn, how long has is been since I've been on a horse ranch?
ruink
5 years, 9 months ago
Heifer is a term related to young cows I believe
SirStefan02
5 years, 9 months ago
I haven't researched it, but I suspect that "heifer" actually became American slang for "cow" because of the popularity of the Hereford breed of dairy cow. If I am not mistaken the Hereford breed is the B/W one most commonly used on dairy farms. I was thinking about it some time ago and repeating the word "heifer" over and over and it almost sounded like it was an old west mispronunciation of "Hereford" and over time became an accepted generic term.
I find human communication to be a fascinating topic that reveals much about our species. Mebbe I'll write a journal entry about Genesis and language that I have pondered from time to time.
MrSOCKS
5 years, 9 months ago
Wikipedia confirms that a heifer is a "virgin" female bovine. Only after her first calve, does she become a "cow".
Just like cats: a female cat is just a cat until she has her first litter. Then, she's called a Queen.
Your deduction about how "heifer" and "Hereford" could have been related is entirely plausable, given how language can mutate the sounds--and therefore the spellings-- of words.
For example: Indian. Columbus called the Caribe natives he encountered a people of God: Los En Dios. That got contracted to Los Endios, and then into Los Indios. How does that link up with that faraway subcontinent Barat, which is Hindustan which is India? The people are Hindus, plural Hindi. However, in Latin-influenced Europe, the 'H' is silent. So Hindi - 'H' = Indi. The land of the Indi would be called India.
Lyserdigi
5 years, 9 months ago
Yeah. I agree with you.
Misuse of terminology really ticks me off too ..
ruink
5 years, 9 months ago
I've said this before, and it keeps being true:  people are stupid
TrentSnow
5 years, 9 months ago
I've noticed this lately as well...good to see I'm not alone.
Infinityplus1
5 years, 9 months ago
Why?

Because, ponies!
RuthofPern
5 years, 9 months ago
Snippet from the Pony club website.

"In modern use, many organizations define a pony as a mature horse that measures less than 14.2 hands (58 inches, 147 cm) at the withers, but there are a number of exceptions. Different organizations that use a strict measurement model vary from 14 hands (56 inches, 142 cm) to nearly 14.3 hands (59 inches, 150 cm). Many breeds classify an animal as either horse or pony based on pedigree and phenotype, no matter its height. Some full-sized horses may be called "ponies" for various reasons of tradition or as a term of endearment."

Though I am not a rider any more my late sister was.  It always stuck in my mind as she had a degree in equine studies and bollocked me whenever I got it wrong!  Biggest pony I ever encountered (By conformation only)  was 16hands, though she was an exception.
Brainsister
5 years, 9 months ago
Boy, I was way off! It's been awhile, and I couldn't remember if a hand was heel-to-fingertip or palm width....
RuthofPern
5 years, 9 months ago
Chuckles...I think a hand is 4 inches...roughly!
FibS
5 years, 9 months ago
What height separates a "pony" from a "horse" varies depending on the breeder's association you ask, but five hands is a good rule of thumb.
CaliWolfNinja
5 years, 9 months ago
I bet some dumb schmuck was hoping to find something MLP related.
BillySquirrel
5 years, 9 months ago
Horses scare me. XD To big, to skittish, they bite, and all it takes is one misplaced hoof and your foot is paste.
SirStefan02
5 years, 9 months ago
Its not impossible, but my parents had horses, and they did step on me on occasion, and my feet are fine. Its always good to have shoes on around horses. 83
gaturday
5 years, 9 months ago
I know more than I ever thought I would about equestrian terminology.

Apropos of nothing, I haven't seen Spike in Warner form.
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