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KichigaiKitsune

I would be horrified.

Watch this, guys.
http://youtu.be/ogmtAQlp9HI

Now, I know many (most) US schools are not like that. But I know that more of them are than we admit. I know several parents/students that have described their schools like this.

I cannot believe the attitude of the school staff. If they see any of the students in the hall, security and such are dispatched "quickly." Jesus Fucking Christ.

Nobody sees what's wrong with this? If I was a parent sending my children to such a facility, I would be disgusted, outraged and horrified. My kids would be out of there in ten fucking minutes, and shame on any parent who would do different (unless they had no choice).

I know what those who would try to defend the school would say, and it's bollocks.
The fact is, it's highly unlikely that the school (that looks far less hospitable and conducive to study than the prison!) has any genuine need for security measures that strict and invasive - and certain no good reason for looking like that. There's no way they didn't design it to look like a prison on purpose.

There's no question that the prison, filled with criminals, is getting more funding than the school filled with students.

But I know some schools like that do exist. My own looked FAR nicer (though still very drab; is there some law that public high schools need to look like shit?), but I had to deal with assholes at school and outside of it.
Readers of my stories will know that I am perfectly aware that violent students exist in dangerous schools, but they're missing my point.

Either that school is being run like a prison for no good reason, and I won't let my kids be accustomed to surveillance and being treated like prisoners, or it's being run that way for a good reason and I'll be damned if my kids are staying there for more than the amount of time it takes for me to get the paperwork done.

It's horrifying.

Nobody else in the world does this, d'ya understand? America is not such a special case that it has good cause for doing this to its teenagers - and anyone who brings up "school shootings" needs to be punched straight in the mouth. Take your panic-mongering elsewhere. Take it to the victims of shark attacks in the last twenty years, there's more of those than school shooting victims.
Viewed: 13 times
Added: 6 years, 9 months ago
 
indorri
6 years, 9 months ago
One quick thing because my mind is currently preoccupied by a lot of other things now and FSM knows what else is coming this way.

I think you nailed it on the head when you stated you wouldn't want your kid to become accustomed to such treatment. It may be that it is a deliberate design choice, though, in order to do exactly that.
aldreyachan
6 years, 9 months ago
The parents who want their kids conditioned that way need their license revoked, so they're just as much to blame as the institutions that take this approach.

There is a license for parenthood, isn't there?
vulPN
6 years, 4 months ago
The schools don't always like having all the cops around. The administrative staff at the school where I worked hated having the police on-site because it forced their hand when it came to delegating punishment for bad behavior. If there was a fight (which was usually at least a couple times a month) the police presence would often make it a criminal case. Mind you, we only had one sheriff's deputy there at a time, so it was hardly a jail in that sense. But it correlated with the prison aspect in so many other ways.

Like the video points out, there are security cameras everywhere. The school had too many doors and not enough resources to put in metal detectors, and the cameras are only used in reviewing incidents (such as theft; and it can prove whether or not a student is telling the truth if he was in that hallway). There are no cameras in the classrooms nor in the short hallway near the locker rooms (which, ironically enough, was the site of an alleged sexual assault). Each bus has multiple cameras, which I find ridiculous. Drug sniffing dogs come in about once a quarter, usually when a student reports to the office that they saw something, but there have been surprise visits in the past. In the elementary schools, students who are picked up by parents after class lets out meet their parents outside the building. Parents who pick up their kids during the day have to be buzzed in through two sets of doors, like in some expensive jewelry stores. You're not allowed to set foot on the property without first reporting to the office (that goes for all levels). And it's getting worse as time goes on.

And the thing is, that is the norm. While not all schools go as crazy as that one does, I've not seen a building in ages that didn't have at least a couple surveillance cameras and a cursory police presence, whether the neighborhood was affluent or poor. So you can't really get your child away from at least some of it. And those are public schools, which are the affordable ones.

On the other hand... what goes on in inner city schools (like Newark, New Jersey) is nearly indescribable. It's a circus. Overcrowded, run-down, 100+ year old buildings filled with students dealing drugs and stolen property in between classes, and overwrought teachers who have either given up on life or are on the verge of nervous breakdowns. Most of the students have little to no home lives, and most of them are related to at least one person in jail. They're also overwhelmingly poor, which makes it that much easier to turn to drugs or crime. In most of the schools, more than half of incoming 9th graders will fail to graduate. In some of them, as little as 1 in 10 graduate. So I get that they're trying to restore order and re-emphasize education. But all this process does is preparing them for life in prison after their arrest. And that needs to stop.
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