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SenGrisane

Encryption for passing secret information

I think about a whole lot of stuff during the day. One is how to encrypt information. Although not mathematically (I am by no way a specialist on that matter... I simply let my mind wander thinking about hiding stuff). More the classic paper versions and classic paper versions adapted to online. Best is when you don't even know there is somthing hidden.

Here. A copy from the first paragraph from wikipedia. I will encrypt a message in it:
In cryptography, encryption is  the process of transforming information (referred to as plaintext) using an algorithm (called a cipher) to make it unreadable to anyone except those possessing special  knowledge, usually referred to as a key. The result of the process  is encrypted information (in cryptography, referred to as ciphertext). In many contexts, the word encryption also implicitly refers to the  reverse process, decryption (e.g. “software for encryption” can typically also perform decryption),  to make the encrypted  information readable again (i.e. to make it unencrypted).

Solution:
I simply added an extra space in front of each word I wanted to have in the message. Double spaces happen on accident in text too so I doubt a computer would try to analyse the number of spaces in a text. It is more obvious in a font where each symbol has the same width.
Highlight for the text: The knowledge is reverse to information.

Another variation for paper would be to use a special font that has "normal" letters and "broken" letters. Broken letters print as if the printer made a printing error (missing a tiny part of the letter, have horizontal lines in it, slightly faded etc.)
The recipient would simply look for a certain type of error (or errors) to read the message. The normal letter have tiny errors too to make it not too obvious.
Again if somebody wants to decipher it (if he knows it is a secret code) he might type it into the computer (or have the computer read it from a scan). And then the code is uncrackable as it was deleted when it was entered into the computer. You'd have to see each letter as a picture (like hiroglyphs) and feed that to the computer.

One method using excel.
You write your message somewhere into the sheet (which is huge: 16384 columns by 1048576 rows in the newest version).
Now you don't wanna write text in somewhere. You "write" by color changing the blocks to make pixel art of the letters bascially. Takes painfully long for longer text, but good luck finding the blocks if you don't know the cell to jump to. Add some uninteresting numbers in the first rows as cover and you are good :3

I thought up several variations for these as well, but those are the basic ones I guess. ^^

Hope it didn't bore you :D
Viewed: 58 times
Added: 6 years, 9 months ago
 
Thanatos
6 years, 9 months ago
Or: You could have a person write a paragraph in Russian where every third letter used will then combine to form a sentence in Japanese, but using Korean grammatical structure. The resulting sentence will be a riddle, the obvious solution of which will be a homonym. This homonym will sound like a 5 letter word from a preset list of memorized words between you and your contacts. The correct one will open the lock, the incorrect ones will destroy the evidence, collapse the chamber, and spray the T virus into the surrounding village, which will then use the zombie apocalypse to distract from your attempt to break into the vault in the first place, giving the clean up operation enough time to come in and reset the password.
SenGrisane
6 years, 9 months ago
That sounds kinda tedious to use for casual encryption <.<
DataPacRat
6 years, 9 months ago
I'm a steganography geek, too. :)  There's lots more that can be done with whitespace than that - you can even encode binary data, with one space for a zero and two spaces for a one. The 'broken letter' trick has a few precedents, one of the more famous being sticking a pin through each desired letter in a newspaper.

The most important part, as far as I know... is telling the person(s) you want to send the message /to/ how you plan on sending the later, secret message; which, of course, requires at least a small amount of communication in itself, which can't itself be hidden in the same way.
SenGrisane
6 years, 9 months ago
I imagined it like people talking on the phone with each other and explaining there, while sending the file via email.

My idea was to foil nosey parents/siblings and such mainly ^^.
KhellSennet
6 years, 9 months ago
Any cipher designed to fool a computer (such as Captcha), typically won't fool a person.  And likewise, ciphers used to fool people, don't always fool computers.  There are always exceptions, yes, but the reason behind this is how we think in more abstract and associative ways, where computers are die-hard literalists and logic-driven.

For m'self, I used to write in code...
Way, way back in the day, in my Grade 9 English class, we had to read "The Hobbit" (which, to me, was insultingly easy as I had read the book in Grade 3).  One assignment involved the map at the front of the book - we were to decipher the runic alphabet on the map, using the poem/translation from later in the book as the guide to figure it out (pic).  Keep in mind, this was the pre-Internet era, so yeah, we had to do it ourselves instead of using Google and Wikipedia.  I was one of the only two students to properly translate the runes, reconstructing the full alphabet.  But it didn't end there with me.  I memorized the alphabet (my cipher), and handed in my final book report written entirely in Runic (I should note Tolkein Runic isn't proper runic.  The alphabet works, but it isn't proper Futhark Runic).  It was a big "Fuck You" to the teacher (whom I hated), but he did actually transcribe it (with some help, as I had uncovered three runes he lacked) and graded it A+ (with a note never to hand in a runic essay ever again).

So that's my tale on encryption.  I'm a bit rusty, but given some time and a swift kick to the head, I can still write in runic, and have at times, used it as a means to leave myself encrypted notes/memos.
EricAdler
6 years, 9 months ago
" It was a big "Fuck You" to the teacher (whom I hated), but he did actually transcribe it (with some help, as I had uncovered three runes he lacked) and graded it A+ (with a note never to hand in a runic essay ever again).


Now that's a fun exchange, "Okay, you're smarter than your teacher, kid.  Now go the fuck away."
KhellSennet
6 years, 9 months ago
Actually, I was smarter than my Grade 9 English teacher (And Grade 11, got him again).  
Total Off-Topic Warning;

For anonymity's sake, let's call him Mr. Dick (a very suitable name on many levels).  He was one of those people who wanted to be a college / university level professor, but (for whatever reason) never made it, and was relegated to teaching high school kids, and he HATED high school kids.  Mr. Dick hated the fact that I would correct him during class, and hated me for being right.  Whether it was out-dated terminology, misuse of British spelling instead of Canadian English, or the occasional use of "idiot" terms like "irregardless", which is in fact, not a proper word.  The old sod was a very strict teacher who believed his way was the only way.  We had large (outdated) hardcover copies of the Webster's English dictionary on the upper right corner of all our desks (you were docked grades for leaving it on the wrong corner), we all had to sit in alphabetical order (which is fine for elementary kids, but not tweens and teens), and had numerous things we had to do that were specific to his class.

One such thing...  Bookmark Notes.  Mr. Dick had us follow a system where we would take a looseleaf sheet of paper, fold it in a very specific manner - in half vertically so that an 8 1/2" x 11" sheet became 4 1/4" x 11", then in half vertically a second time.  Then we had to write our name, class #, grade, and the assigned book's title on the top of this "bookmark", on the side to the left of the second crease.  The point of this nonsense was that while we read the book, we write down any words we don't understand the meaning of on the left side (under the name, etc).  Then, when next in class, we would unfold the page (1 fold, so it's back to a half-width sheet) and write beside the word, on the opposite side of the crease, the definition.  Said definitions being pulled from the big hardcover dictionaries on our desk, copied verbatim.

Now on some level, there is a sense to this assigment.  Don't understand something, look it up.  Simple, right?  But copying word-for-word from a dictionary isn't exactly teaching you anything, and worse yet, the way this was graded was biased and flawed.  We earned a maximum of 20 marks for a book's "bookmark notes".  That was one point per word.  Now think for a second, how would someone like myself be graded?  I'd hand in note after note with no words on them, and in turn, I would consistantly get 0/20.  Meanwhile, an ESL student from Haiti we had in the class was getting perfect scores every time.  Back in grade six, I was tested and found to have a second-year college student's vocabulary and comprehension.  That was grade six, Dick's class was grade nine...  There were NO words in any of the books that I didn't understand.  And for that, I was failing English, while the ESL student who could barely form a proper sentence was acing the class.  And yes, I could have "faked it" as Mr. Dick suggested.  Pick out some words, and write the definitions.  But I have pride, and my pride wouldn't let me stoop down to dunce-level just for him.

I actually contested it with the principal, who himself tested me by picking random words out of a couple of the course's books.  He couldn't find one word I didn't have the correct definition of, not just one definition, but the proper definition in context.  He forced Mr. Dick to give me 20/20 on all previous and future bookmark notes assignments, whilst allowing me to still hand in the blank page.  That, you can be sure, made Mr. Dick hate me even more than previous.

That's one story, and I'm running out of characters here, so I can't be so elaborate on the other grievance over him, but you'll probably get a chuckle out of knowing I was repeatedly kicked out of English class, and sent to the principal's office, for reading a book.
Alfador
6 years, 9 months ago
I ended up compiling a transliteration guide for Tengwar in high school. I didn't use it for any classes, but the fact that vowels are diacritical marks on the following consonant rather than symbols separate like a letter in their own right, would make cryptography of it VERY difficult if you weren't aware of that little wrinkle. Because I was studying Spanish at the time, and one of the symbols was unused and had to be a nasal to fit the pattern, I used it for 'ñ'.

Someone familiar with the invented language could decipher it easily; however, enough of it was unlisted in the books and appendices and had to be (re)constructed by me, that it would not be a trivial matter even for a Tolkien scholar.
KhellSennet
6 years, 9 months ago
I could see that being a much harder faux-language to crack.  Runic at least had a solid real-world origin and a sample provided which covered nigh the entire alphabet.
SenGrisane
6 years, 9 months ago
I dunno. Some captcha pictures fool me too. <.<
KhellSennet
6 years, 9 months ago
Yes, me too.  But on the whole, I'm betting both of us can figure out more than not.  A computer, not so good.
PlatinumPen
6 years, 9 months ago
In addition, if you wished to encrypt further use the double space idea along with the idea that any sentence with a spelling error or improper noun is to be ignored. That way even if somebody cracks the code they could get the wrong message.

Another have a date referenced in the document and let every word that equals the month, day, or alternating between the two be part of the message.
Example: If the date referenced was July 7 then every 4th word, or every 7th word, or every 4th word then every 7th word would be part of this message.

Another one is use of homonyms, words that sound the same but have different meanings (Boar and Bore for example) this is usually added to other encryptions to throw people off.

That's all I can think of for the moment.
SenGrisane
6 years, 9 months ago
Very nice ideas ^^

I didn't know people would be so interested in this :P
PlatinumPen
6 years, 9 months ago
Well I do play D&D and mind puzzles are a great part of the game.
SenGrisane
6 years, 9 months ago
Depends on the players but i do enjoy those too :3
LordChaos
6 years, 9 months ago
The simplest and yet hardest cypher system to use is called a One Time Pad cypher.  Each page contains random letters.  You use the page once and then destroy it and go to the next.  The only person who can decypher your message is the holder of a similar pad.  Very similar to using a book cypher but since Government agencies like the NSA (No Such Agency) have downloaded entire libraries, including all newspapers and magazines, in attempts to crack just that type of code, it is best not to use a book cypher anymore.

Just remember.  The Germans thought they had an unbreakable code machine, Enigma.  During the war the British were reading Enigma intercepts before the German officers they were sent to.  Any code can be broken, eventually.  Some  just take a little longer than others.  Took folks 300 years to crack Da Vinci's Code and all he did was write backwards.
SenGrisane
6 years, 9 months ago
I could use my porn stories for a book cypher :D
Alfador
6 years, 9 months ago
Note that using the double space method may result in missed words as read by the intended recipient, if one or more of the double spaces happens to fall at the end of a line when printed on screen.
SenGrisane
6 years, 9 months ago
You can simply copy it to word and replace every two spaces with a ! for easy readability ;3
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