Welcome to Inkbunny...
Allowed ratings
To view member-only content, create an account. ( Hide )
8Horns

iPad2 as a drawing tablet ?

by

Any iPad 2 owners here have used  it a drawing tablet ? Would you recommend it ?
I tried drawing sketches using my fingers in a demo unit in the store and there seems to be no lag in the input .They told me I can use a stylus to draw directly from it , but they don't have demo units of that stylus .

I'm looking for something portable to draw on . I would also want to export the images I drew on the Ipad to my PC if that's possible .. XD
Viewed: 90 times
Added: 6 years, 12 months ago
 
tannim
6 years, 12 months ago
I've never even seen a iPad(1 or 2).  If it's a capacitative touch screen though you can probably draw on it but without any pressure sensitivity.  Even with a resistive touch screen you can draw, but resistive sucks.  There are capacitative stylus pens you can buy(or maybe make your own) that should work.

I ordered an HP Touchpad 16gb, will see how that works for drawing eventually :}
8Horns
6 years, 12 months ago
Didn't see any HP touchpad being sold where I live . probably not in the 99 USD price that I heard . ^^;
tannim
6 years, 12 months ago
It was actually $115 after shipping and taxes for me. I could have picked it up in store for about $8 less.  Still waiting for it to arrive.  If you can draw on the ipad then you can easily email yourself the picture.  Also you could just use your shared folders on your network or even run a server program on your computer to access and upload to.
TitusWolf
6 years, 12 months ago
Ive done some sketches from the Ipad 1 using sketchbook pro. I didnt use the stylus but it wasnt bad. If you were wanting to use the ipad as your primary choice of drawing  I wouldnt recommend it but to work from occasionally its not too bad.
8Horns
6 years, 12 months ago
can you export the images you drawn in the ipad to your PC ?
TitusWolf
6 years, 12 months ago
I sent mine to my email address and went from there. That was easiest for me.
Bluelimelight
6 years, 12 months ago
Hmm. I was thinking about doing that also but I have no feedback for you.
8Horns
6 years, 12 months ago
that's alright , now draw more lolis ! XD
Bluelimelight
6 years, 12 months ago
Im tryin' but the furry have me by the left nut rite noewz
InsecureFlaky
6 years, 12 months ago
We own an Ipad2 here, and have tried several drawing programs as well, but theydont seem to allow any kind of stilus
I dowloaded Wacom Sketchbook, and used a WACOM pen from my tablet and even then it easnt dectected

I wouldnt recommend using the ipad to substitude what a big computer should do
8Horns
6 years, 12 months ago
I think you would need a bamboo pen to do that . Not sure if it can simulate pressure sensitivity though .
http://bamboostylus.wacom.asia/
otherart
6 years, 12 months ago
Don't mess around, get a Wacom.^^
8Horns
6 years, 12 months ago
I already got a wacom , But I'm also away from home most of the time .  I just wanted something I can bring around and draw without setting up the cables  . ^^;
otherart
6 years, 12 months ago
Oh, yes, I can see that.^^
captpackrat
6 years, 12 months ago
I have a Motorola Xoom tablet (Android), a Kensington capacitive-tip pen and Autodesk SketchBook Mobile.

It thoroughly sucks for drawing.  With a capacitive touch screen, it's pretty much impossible to get anything resembling precision.  There is no pressure sensitivity, and it's very hard to draw lines close together.  All the sketches I've done look like they were drawn by a 3 year old with a crayon.  Since it uses the same touchscreen technology, I highly doubt the iPad would be any better.

It's great for doodling, but I wouldn't even dream of using one as a replacement for a real drawing tablet.
8Horns
6 years, 12 months ago
ah thanks I'll look more into it then .  
ObZen
6 years, 12 months ago
I have an Asus Eee Pad Transformer, a capacitive stylus and SketchBook Pro and have had a great time drawing on it. You lose out on pressure sensitivity, but it is far more portable than my tablet pc which weighs about ten times as much but has similar if not better battery life. Could I see complete works being done on it? Possibly with a lot of patience. As a rough out sketch tool it's great. I just sketch out my drawing and throw the file into dropbox on my tablet and then grab it on my laptop to finish it up.
8Horns
6 years, 12 months ago
Thanks , thats good know , yeah I just plan to sketch on a tablet then finish it up on the pc later . I guess it just depends on the person using it I guess . :)
ObZen
6 years, 12 months ago
I've found the stylus to be a must have in this instance. Also, if you do go this route, I found it very useful to have something non-conductive to set on the screen to rest your hand on while you draw so you're not putting down another contact point and invoking some other command. I just use the tip of a cut off sock filled with plastic beads and it helps immensely.

I honestly just love the portability of it. I've enjoyed it so much that I've tried to challenge myself and go out of my comfort zone into completing drawings on it (colouring, shading, etc.) since it is a bit different from what I'm used to on my Wacom. It can get frustrating, but I've never regretted the purchase (especially considering using it as a digital sketchpad was a big use for me.)

I'm also considering trying to use a Livescribe pen to do my sketching and importing them as well. The neat little thing about that is you can do "pencasts" that tie audio into your drawing so I can see it working well for "nonlive" streams and tutorials. They're relatively cheap too, so it'll be a relatively inexpensive experiment.
rnixon
6 years, 12 months ago
The Lenovo Thinkpad Tablet (which comes out this week) has a pressure-sensitive stylus. 256 levels. The iPad cannot do pressure sensitivity; a stylus on it is no more accurate than your finger.

I'm not sure about pressure-aware drawing software, though. It comes with a notepad/sketch app that supports the pen, but I don't know if Autodesk's art software (which seems to be pretty good!) does.

Capacitive touchscreens like the iPad and most tablets can't register anything other than 'someone is touching the surface at these points'. They can't tell how hard they're pressed, or how large a spot is being touched. The Thinkpad Tablet has an active digitizer as well as the touchscreen. (It's also kind of ugly, since it has that Thinkpad 'business' look to it.)
xichan
6 years, 12 months ago
I can't promise it'll work this way, but the thinkpad is Android based. Android is Linux, and as long as this thing is on your network, you should be able to just share folders and/or access shared folders on your computer through the network. It might take some third party software or hacking around to do it, but I know it's possible. Hell, I do it on my android phone!
KelperFoxWolf
6 years, 12 months ago
Only the HTC Flyer shows signs of being okay for sketching. Thing is, I have read some users experience problems with the stylus recognition in art apps.
Apart from that, not only wouldn't I recommend the iPad 2 as a drawing tablet, but in fact I wouldn't recommend ANY TABLET with a capacitive touchscreen. They lack pressure-sensitive levels, and so far no third-party stylus pens work properly. Sketchbook Pro Mobile's the only app worth using for drawing, but it's the hardware which limits you, not only in requirements, but also when it comes to how clumsy it feels.
Resistive touchscreens aren't that better, either. I've tried sketching on a COBY KYROS MID7024, which has resistive touchscreen and a stylus pen as stock equipment, and the experience wasn't that good. Sometimes, you feel you're just about going to scratch or break the screen.
The ASUS EEETransformer has a screen and a stylus both certified by WACOM as far as I know, but I haven't read on anything regarding performance with that.
Anyway, it doesn't matter. This all shows me (and I hope it'll show you too) that Tablets are not good for drawing. If we start talking about old convertible TabletPCs, and with that I mean REAL TabletPCs, such as HPs TC1100, or the TX1000, then things are different, as in both cases the performance of the PC as a drawing tablet is exceptional, and overall I wouldn't mind the weight of those machines (However, I would worry about the TX1000's cooling system).

In other words, my recommendation? Get a real TabletPC from yesteryear, not these trendy gizmos of today. I'd recommend the TC1100 from HP, if it wasn't for its specs (512MB -expandable to 2GB- RAM, Celeron or Pentium M Centrino -800Mhz to 1.25Ghz-, 40GB HDD, 32MB nVIDIA GeForce Go -I think it's the MX-). You'll barely run Windows 7. Only pro is that its stylus pen and its screen were certified by WACOM too, and that it can be either a convertible or a slate tablet (detachable keyboard).
ButtercupSaiyan
6 years, 12 months ago
What's wrong with an old-fashioned mechanical pencil and a sketchpad?! They're just as portable...

I mean, honestly...
8Horns
6 years, 12 months ago
Nothing wrong with  it .  But I rarely post art using traditional methods . ^^;
Sanae
6 years, 11 months ago
If you need same drawing quality to tablet + desktop PC, I recommend Eee Slate EP121.
EP121 has been develped with WACOM, so some of WACOM pen can be used on it.
And OS is Windows 7 and memory is 4GB...you can duplicate environment of your desktop.

I use it sometime for doodle, precise pen drawing, painting...basically I satisfy its quality and power.
I have tried some gudget for drawing outside my home....Palm, HP's PDA, Laptop + small tablet...and finally I found what I wanted.
Demerit is low battery...it last 3hours... :(

If you are interested in it, please watch this review.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HAZg9bEPm1E&feature...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LTKFWt-Mrg&feature...
WhoreOMatic
6 years, 11 months ago
Drawing with a capacitive stylus is not ideal, but it is possible to do decent art with it.  Several of my drawings were done that way including my most recent one.
silvergunner
6 years, 11 months ago
Before I threw my artwork drive into the bin, I used a cheap iPhone/iPad capitative stylus with MyPaint (it was free, albeit incredibly limited). It works well, and I prefer it to wacom tablets tbh (as I get friction between the rubber-tipped pen and the screen - something unavailable on the slippery Graphire3 surface).

After using other ones such as a Palm and DS with home brew drawing apps, a graphire3 tablet, and even a friend's Windows XP Tablet laptop (which cost him £1,500) iPad is the best option.

That's not to mention everything else the iPad can do...
New Comment:
Move reply box to top
Log in or create an account to comment.