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supremekitten

Cat survives fall from a plane!

1. A cat, most likely, reaches terminal velocity at around 7 floors of height
2. only 5% of cats (not sure how accurate this data is, but even if not entirely, it's still a minority of cats) die falling from such height (even if they fall on concrete).
3. When falling from a larger height a cat doesn't accelerate anymore.
4. Conclusion: a cat can theoretically easily survive falling from any height.

Final conclusion: A cat can, and probably will survive being dropped from a helicopter or an airplane without a parachute.

Picture somewhat related
http://i635.photobucket.com/albums/uu74/nukkafifth/123...
Viewed: 111 times
Added: 7 years, 3 months ago
 
drbrochette
7 years, 3 months ago
hnnnng... catgirls. <3

Oh, and nice facts. :)
drbrochette
7 years, 3 months ago
damn it, doublepost. :/
ChaosSabre
7 years, 3 months ago
lololololol
Priest22
7 years, 3 months ago
I love this - feline physics!

My question is: would a long haired cat have a slower rate of decent due to air resistance?  

supremekitten
7 years, 3 months ago
yes "In addition to the righting reflex cats have a number of other features that will reduce damage from a fall. Their small size, light bone structure, and thick fur decrease their terminal velocity. Furthermore, once righted they may also spread out their body to increase drag and slow the fall to some extent. A falling cat's terminal velocity is 100 km/h (60mph) whereas that of a falling man in a "free fall position" is 210 km/h (130mph)."
SenGrisane
7 years, 3 months ago
My cat book has a survival statistic on falling cats. It said mortality rate is highest from 3rd level (or 3 meters. I don't remember now exactly). Going further up it decreases again. This is because the cat has more time to prepare for landing and to bring itsel in optimal position.

But it should be noted that falls from great heights often result in broken legs, noses, and ribs even if the cat survives. So don't try it at home.
supremekitten
7 years, 3 months ago
Indeed, because the cat flattens it's body, for example the jaw can suffer a fracture.
xichan
7 years, 3 months ago
I wonder if there is some way for humans to decrease their terminal velocity when falling from great height. I know our instincts act against us, since we want to put our feet down first, which makes us aerodynamically faster...
KhellSennet
7 years, 3 months ago
The very cruel side of me wonders how these facts would play out with another cat-fact (namely, the taped-fur scenario).

If you put a piece of tape on the side, top, or belly of a cat, it changes how it walks.  Now combine that with a falling cat, will it still land on its feet?  And what kind of acrobatics display will you see as it falls?

And no, do not try this!  It's just fun for thought.
Shokuji
7 years, 3 months ago
rnixon
7 years, 3 months ago
The data on 'cats falling from higher heights take less damage' is flawed.

The problem is that this data is entirely based on cats *that are brought to the veterinarian* after their fall.

If a cat is obviously _dead_, it's not included in the statistic. You're not going to bring obvious road pizza to the emergency room.

Yes, cats have at times survived falling from great heights. But then, humans have fallen from aircraft / had parachutes fail and survived.


supremekitten
7 years, 3 months ago
While the data MAY indeed be flawed, it doesn't change the fact that cats do reach a terminal velocity at 60 miles per hour (and most of them survive a fall with that velocity), and while there could be other possible elements to consider while falling from great heights (for example fainting because of a lack of oxygen or something) it doesn't change the fact, that if a cat easily survives falling from 7'th floor, it should also survive the fall from a helicopter, as long as it doesn't get frozen or suffocated from some ridiculously high drop. And by survive I mean without some external thing to slow down the fall. Another fact: falling "on" water from 100 meters is like hitting concrete.
Caseydragon
7 years, 3 months ago
" supremekitten wrote:
While the data MAY indeed be flawed, it doesn't change the fact that cats do reach a terminal velocity at 60 miles per hour (and most of them survive a fall with that velocity), and while there could be other possible elements to consider while falling from great heights (for example fainting because of a lack of oxygen or something) it doesn't change the fact, that if a cat easily survives falling from 7'th floor, it should also survive the fall from a helicopter, as long as it doesn't get frozen or suffocated from some ridiculously high drop. And by survive I mean without some external thing to slow down the fall. Another fact: falling "on" water from 100 meters is like hitting concrete.
Um the whole water is hard as concrete is flawed watch Mythbusters on Discovery they did a show at the beginning of this month. It showed if you dropped a person at a hundred feet on concrete and water. Water was softer each at the same heights each time. If I remember correctly you need a 250 hundred foot drop into water, to equal an one hundred foot drop onto concrete.
supremekitten
7 years, 3 months ago
Details, it's still death
DoctorO
7 years, 3 months ago
Now what if the cat had an M60?
Tactical attack cats GO!
EricAdler
7 years, 3 months ago
Hmmm, Cat's can theoretically survive a fall from any height.  What would be a good test of that theory.....

( Designs payload to be sent to the ISS, one container, designed to fall back towards earth, and jettison the cat from the edge of the atmosphere.... )   ;-)
supremekitten
7 years, 3 months ago
still, in case of extreme heights we have to consider other things unrelated to fall damage, like extremely cold temperatures, air pressure, lack of oxygen
EricAdler
7 years, 3 months ago
Yes, but if I stopped to consider ALL the extra variables I'm throwing into the experiment, they'll revoke my Mad Scientist License.   ;- )
supremekitten
7 years, 3 months ago
For a long time I've had this idea for an experiment: placing kittens on a bound cub genitalia, to see if they will scratch and watch the reactions.
Alfador
7 years, 3 months ago
And remember, before you open the capsule, the cat is both alive and dead! :D
supremekitten
7 years, 3 months ago
http://dagobah.net/flash/nazi_kitty.swf
And his name was Schrödinger
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